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Externalizing shame responses in children: the role of fragile-positive self-esteem

Externalizing shame responses in children: the role of fragile-positive self-esteem
Externalizing shame responses in children: the role of fragile-positive self-esteem
When faced with shame, children can either respond in submissive ways to withdraw from their environment or in externalizing ways to oppose their environment. This study tested the hypothesis that fragile-positive views of self predispose children to respond in externalizing ways to shame situations. Narcissism, actual and perceived social preference, global self-worth and propensity towards externalizing shame responding were measured in 122 pre-adolescent children. As expected, results revealed that narcissism, in contrast to global self-worth, was associated with externalizing shame responding. In addition, actual but not perceived social preference was inversely related to externalizing shame responding, suggesting that the social self-perceptions of children prone to employ externalizing shame responses may be inflated. Discussion focuses on the self-regulatory function of externalizing shame responses.
0261-510X
559-577
Thomaes, Sander
ec762bc3-0df4-42c3-99f4-1a7b65f55053
Stegge, Hedy
fa277cdd-99bf-45e5-8920-b5fb515dbeb7
Olthof, Tjeert
23ea58bb-0317-401c-a0b7-3b7a3e89a4c3
Thomaes, Sander
ec762bc3-0df4-42c3-99f4-1a7b65f55053
Stegge, Hedy
fa277cdd-99bf-45e5-8920-b5fb515dbeb7
Olthof, Tjeert
23ea58bb-0317-401c-a0b7-3b7a3e89a4c3

Thomaes, Sander, Stegge, Hedy and Olthof, Tjeert (2007) Externalizing shame responses in children: the role of fragile-positive self-esteem. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 25 (4), 559-577. (doi:10.1348/026151007X173827).

Record type: Article

Abstract

When faced with shame, children can either respond in submissive ways to withdraw from their environment or in externalizing ways to oppose their environment. This study tested the hypothesis that fragile-positive views of self predispose children to respond in externalizing ways to shame situations. Narcissism, actual and perceived social preference, global self-worth and propensity towards externalizing shame responding were measured in 122 pre-adolescent children. As expected, results revealed that narcissism, in contrast to global self-worth, was associated with externalizing shame responding. In addition, actual but not perceived social preference was inversely related to externalizing shame responding, suggesting that the social self-perceptions of children prone to employ externalizing shame responses may be inflated. Discussion focuses on the self-regulatory function of externalizing shame responses.

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Published date: 2007
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349223
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349223
ISSN: 0261-510X
PURE UUID: f667ffcf-55eb-4626-9d38-293b2d99cf3d

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Date deposited: 26 Feb 2013 14:31
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:42

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Contributors

Author: Sander Thomaes
Author: Hedy Stegge
Author: Tjeert Olthof

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