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Effect of poly-dispersity on the stability of agglomerates subjected to simple fluid strain fields

Effect of poly-dispersity on the stability of agglomerates subjected to simple fluid strain fields
Effect of poly-dispersity on the stability of agglomerates subjected to simple fluid strain fields
A numerical investigation of agglomerate breakup is conducted. By combining the discrete element method with hydrodynamic forces, both monodisperse and polydisperse agglomerates are subjected to three types of flow field: simple, elongational and pure rotational shear. By studying the break-up process sequence in each flow type, qualitative information about the fundamental mechanisms by which deagglomeration occurs is compared between cases and with the literature. The quantitative effectiveness of simple shear and elongational flows to break-up a monodisperse agglomerate agrees well with the relevant literature. Rotational flows are found to differ fundamentally in the way in which agglomerate break-up occurs. By minimising agglomerate translation, the energy from the flow increases the agglomerated angular momentum, eventually causing failure by rupture. Shear flows with open streamlines however may convect the agglomerate away before being able to achieve breakup. Polydispersity is found to have an effect on the qualitative break-up effectiveness; however, the fundamental break-up mechanisms remain the same as for the monodisperse agglomerate.
0032-5910
241-249
Shrimpton, J.S.
9cf82d2e-2f00-4ddf-bd19-9aff443784af
Danby, M.
1118740e-af5e-4bef-8eaf-31f69524c6b2
Shrimpton, J.S.
9cf82d2e-2f00-4ddf-bd19-9aff443784af
Danby, M.
1118740e-af5e-4bef-8eaf-31f69524c6b2

Shrimpton, J.S. and Danby, M. (2012) Effect of poly-dispersity on the stability of agglomerates subjected to simple fluid strain fields Powder Technology, 228, pp. 241-249. (doi:10.1016/j.powtec.2012.05.025).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A numerical investigation of agglomerate breakup is conducted. By combining the discrete element method with hydrodynamic forces, both monodisperse and polydisperse agglomerates are subjected to three types of flow field: simple, elongational and pure rotational shear. By studying the break-up process sequence in each flow type, qualitative information about the fundamental mechanisms by which deagglomeration occurs is compared between cases and with the literature. The quantitative effectiveness of simple shear and elongational flows to break-up a monodisperse agglomerate agrees well with the relevant literature. Rotational flows are found to differ fundamentally in the way in which agglomerate break-up occurs. By minimising agglomerate translation, the energy from the flow increases the agglomerated angular momentum, eventually causing failure by rupture. Shear flows with open streamlines however may convect the agglomerate away before being able to achieve breakup. Polydispersity is found to have an effect on the qualitative break-up effectiveness; however, the fundamental break-up mechanisms remain the same as for the monodisperse agglomerate.

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Published date: September 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349244
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349244
ISSN: 0032-5910
PURE UUID: 5b5436e2-8357-46c3-ae6e-a027884a765f

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Date deposited: 26 Feb 2013 16:58
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:43

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Contributors

Author: J.S. Shrimpton
Author: M. Danby

University divisions

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