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Initial teacher training: understanding ‘race’, diversity and inclusion

Initial teacher training: understanding ‘race’, diversity and inclusion
Initial teacher training: understanding ‘race’, diversity and inclusion
There is little research which has explored how students on Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses understand and conceptualise discourses of ‘race’, diversity and inclusion. This article will focus on student understandings of racialised identities; it will explore the discourses by which students understand what it means to be White and what it means to be Black, within the context of ITT. The article will examine the different facets and themes of identity within the context of belonging and exclusion which exist within higher education in the cultural and social contexts of English universities. The findings indicate that students’ understandings of ‘race’, diversity and inclusion on ITT courses are complex and multifaceted. The article argues that greater training is needed in relation to the practical assistance that student teachers require in terms of increasing their understanding of diversity and dealing with racism in the classroom.
'race’, diversity, inclusion, initial teacher training, trainee teachers
1361-3324
304-325
Bhopal, Kalwant
5ac0970e-1c42-4757-87df-6fdb6f826314
Rhamie, Jasmine
0f4486b3-1131-4206-b020-4e97387db1e8
Bhopal, Kalwant
5ac0970e-1c42-4757-87df-6fdb6f826314
Rhamie, Jasmine
0f4486b3-1131-4206-b020-4e97387db1e8

Bhopal, Kalwant and Rhamie, Jasmine (2014) Initial teacher training: understanding ‘race’, diversity and inclusion. [in special issue: Initial Teacher Education: Developments, Dilemmas and Challenges] Race Ethnicity and Education, 17 (3), 304-325. (doi:10.1080/13613324.2013.832920).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is little research which has explored how students on Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses understand and conceptualise discourses of ‘race’, diversity and inclusion. This article will focus on student understandings of racialised identities; it will explore the discourses by which students understand what it means to be White and what it means to be Black, within the context of ITT. The article will examine the different facets and themes of identity within the context of belonging and exclusion which exist within higher education in the cultural and social contexts of English universities. The findings indicate that students’ understandings of ‘race’, diversity and inclusion on ITT courses are complex and multifaceted. The article argues that greater training is needed in relation to the practical assistance that student teachers require in terms of increasing their understanding of diversity and dealing with racism in the classroom.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 7 November 2013
Published date: 2014
Keywords: 'race’, diversity, inclusion, initial teacher training, trainee teachers

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349400
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349400
ISSN: 1361-3324
PURE UUID: f560e998-304e-45b1-a951-0299724bc510

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Date deposited: 04 Mar 2013 11:24
Last modified: 28 Oct 2019 21:10

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Contributors

Author: Kalwant Bhopal
Author: Jasmine Rhamie

University divisions

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