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The Role of adaptive mission planning and control in persistent autonomous underwater vehicles presence

The Role of adaptive mission planning and control in persistent autonomous underwater vehicles presence
The Role of adaptive mission planning and control in persistent autonomous underwater vehicles presence
The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) community has for many years recognized the potential benefits made by adapting mission planning on-the-fly. Over the years there has been some degree of success in applying adaptive mission planning to very specific problems. Examples of applications include capabilities for a vehicle to search for, and then modify its trajectory to follow, a feature such as a plume or a thermocline, or to modify its trajectory to avoid an obstacle, or to find and follow a feature such as a pipeline. Despite an evident increase in the number of applications, the use of adaptive mission planning is still in its infancy. There is no doubt that adaptive mission planning will play a pivotal role in future AUV persistent presence. So what is delaying this technology from making the leap towards wider industry acceptance? This paper reviews the literature in adaptive mission planning and uses a failure analysis technique to identify key obstacles for the integration of this technique in wider AUV applications. We use our failure analysis to help devise recommendations for mitigating these obstacles. The complexity of the mathematical approaches used by adaptive techniques is one key obstacle. Perhaps of more importance is that the AUV community is increasingly requiring quantitative assessment of risk associated with the use of AUVs. We propose that probability is the appropriate measure for quantifying the risk of adaptive systems and their uncertainty. The work here presented is a collective endeavor of the Engineering Committee on Oceanic Resources Specialist Panel on Underwater Vehicles.
adaptive mission planning, autonomous underwater vehicles, positioning, precision, risk
978-1-4577-2055-0
1-9
IEEE
Brito, M.P.
82e798e7-e032-4841-992e-81c6f13a9e6c
Bose, N.
4c8984f6-8adc-41a4-bbc2-59a795593e08
Lewis, R.
6f1ba3ae-babd-4e0e-9fc4-7dee2e4d57af
Alexander, P.
e43546a3-01a5-46fd-9dd7-4d157f5623cd
Griffiths, G.
2887c3c7-95f2-4834-b3f6-0284344d3580
Ferguson, J.
34464d8d-6953-405a-bcb0-6e3ab19ef153
Brito, M.P.
82e798e7-e032-4841-992e-81c6f13a9e6c
Bose, N.
4c8984f6-8adc-41a4-bbc2-59a795593e08
Lewis, R.
6f1ba3ae-babd-4e0e-9fc4-7dee2e4d57af
Alexander, P.
e43546a3-01a5-46fd-9dd7-4d157f5623cd
Griffiths, G.
2887c3c7-95f2-4834-b3f6-0284344d3580
Ferguson, J.
34464d8d-6953-405a-bcb0-6e3ab19ef153

Brito, M.P., Bose, N., Lewis, R., Alexander, P., Griffiths, G. and Ferguson, J. (2012) The Role of adaptive mission planning and control in persistent autonomous underwater vehicles presence. In 2012 IEEE/OES Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV). IEEE. pp. 1-9 . (doi:10.1109/AUV.2012.6380748).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) community has for many years recognized the potential benefits made by adapting mission planning on-the-fly. Over the years there has been some degree of success in applying adaptive mission planning to very specific problems. Examples of applications include capabilities for a vehicle to search for, and then modify its trajectory to follow, a feature such as a plume or a thermocline, or to modify its trajectory to avoid an obstacle, or to find and follow a feature such as a pipeline. Despite an evident increase in the number of applications, the use of adaptive mission planning is still in its infancy. There is no doubt that adaptive mission planning will play a pivotal role in future AUV persistent presence. So what is delaying this technology from making the leap towards wider industry acceptance? This paper reviews the literature in adaptive mission planning and uses a failure analysis technique to identify key obstacles for the integration of this technique in wider AUV applications. We use our failure analysis to help devise recommendations for mitigating these obstacles. The complexity of the mathematical approaches used by adaptive techniques is one key obstacle. Perhaps of more importance is that the AUV community is increasingly requiring quantitative assessment of risk associated with the use of AUVs. We propose that probability is the appropriate measure for quantifying the risk of adaptive systems and their uncertainty. The work here presented is a collective endeavor of the Engineering Committee on Oceanic Resources Specialist Panel on Underwater Vehicles.

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More information

Published date: 2012
Venue - Dates: conference; gb; 2012-09-24; 2012-09-27, United Kingdom, 2012-09-24 - 2012-09-27
Keywords: adaptive mission planning, autonomous underwater vehicles, positioning, precision, risk
Organisations: Engineering Science Unit, Ocean Technology and Engineering

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349424
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349424
ISBN: 978-1-4577-2055-0
PURE UUID: aa6ad157-2510-40e3-9bcd-e606a47eee9f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Mar 2013 14:40
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:42

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