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Acoustic emission and sonoluminescence due to cavitation at the beam focus of an electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter

Acoustic emission and sonoluminescence due to cavitation at the beam focus of an electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter
Acoustic emission and sonoluminescence due to cavitation at the beam focus of an electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter
The acoustic emission from cavitation in the field of an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter has been studied using a lead zirconate titanate piezoceramic (PC4) hydrophone in the form of a 100-mm diameter focused bowl of 120-mm focal length. With this hydrophone directed at the beam focus of an electrohydraulic lithotripter radiating into water, it is possible to identify signals well above the noise level, at the 1-MHz resonance of the hydrophone, which originate at the beam focus. Light emission, attributed to sonoluminescence, is also shown to originate at the focal region of the lithotripter, and the signal obtained from a fast photomultiplier tube directed at the focus has similarities in structure and timing to the detected acoustic signals. The multiple shock emission resulting from a single discharge of an electrohydraulic source is shown to result in two separate bursts of cavitational activity separated by a period of 3-4 ms. The signal burst corresponding to the primary shock has a duration of about 600 us with little noticeable structure. The signal burst associated with the secondary shock has a reproducible structure with two distinct peaks separated by about ~200 us depending on the shock amplitude. The timing and structure of each burst is shown to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretical predictions made by Church (1989) based on the Gilmore model of bubble dynamics. In particular, it is shown that it is possible to obtain precise measurements of the time delay between the separate peaks within the signal burst detected following the secondary shock and this may, as predicted, provide a method of determining the size of bubbles remaining after the primary shock.
0301-5629
267-281
Coleman, A.J.
1c05afe0-16b8-4547-98fb-93ed8872ea0e
Choi, M.J.
50c5eb49-12d5-4e03-bd0a-83eb3f345bf6
Saunders, J.E.
51ae68d9-0d48-4cbb-a67d-e5e435f4eac7
Leighton, T.G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Coleman, A.J.
1c05afe0-16b8-4547-98fb-93ed8872ea0e
Choi, M.J.
50c5eb49-12d5-4e03-bd0a-83eb3f345bf6
Saunders, J.E.
51ae68d9-0d48-4cbb-a67d-e5e435f4eac7
Leighton, T.G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae

Coleman, A.J., Choi, M.J., Saunders, J.E. and Leighton, T.G. (1992) Acoustic emission and sonoluminescence due to cavitation at the beam focus of an electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 18 (3), 267-281.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The acoustic emission from cavitation in the field of an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter has been studied using a lead zirconate titanate piezoceramic (PC4) hydrophone in the form of a 100-mm diameter focused bowl of 120-mm focal length. With this hydrophone directed at the beam focus of an electrohydraulic lithotripter radiating into water, it is possible to identify signals well above the noise level, at the 1-MHz resonance of the hydrophone, which originate at the beam focus. Light emission, attributed to sonoluminescence, is also shown to originate at the focal region of the lithotripter, and the signal obtained from a fast photomultiplier tube directed at the focus has similarities in structure and timing to the detected acoustic signals. The multiple shock emission resulting from a single discharge of an electrohydraulic source is shown to result in two separate bursts of cavitational activity separated by a period of 3-4 ms. The signal burst corresponding to the primary shock has a duration of about 600 us with little noticeable structure. The signal burst associated with the secondary shock has a reproducible structure with two distinct peaks separated by about ~200 us depending on the shock amplitude. The timing and structure of each burst is shown to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretical predictions made by Church (1989) based on the Gilmore model of bubble dynamics. In particular, it is shown that it is possible to obtain precise measurements of the time delay between the separate peaks within the signal burst detected following the secondary shock and this may, as predicted, provide a method of determining the size of bubbles remaining after the primary shock.

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Published date: 1992
Organisations: Acoustics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349523
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349523
ISSN: 0301-5629
PURE UUID: 0f711cee-42f1-4155-a395-f1be8ffedc72
ORCID for T.G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

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Date deposited: 07 Mar 2013 09:12
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:08

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