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The regional migration of young adults in England and Wales (2002-08): a ‘conveyor-belt’ of population redistribution?

The regional migration of young adults in England and Wales (2002-08): a ‘conveyor-belt’ of population redistribution?
The regional migration of young adults in England and Wales (2002-08): a ‘conveyor-belt’ of population redistribution?
This paper calls for a more encompassing perspective of the regional migration patterns of young adults (16-24), extending studies of labour-motivated graduate migration. It is argued the long-distance movement(s) of young adults per se is a leading constituent of demographic and population changes in society; emphasising the connections between youthful stages of the lifecourse and high levels of population mobility that include students, graduates and other sub-groups. Using revised NHSCR data to interrogate regional migration flows in England and Wales (2002-2008), our descriptive analyses reveal three key findings. First, it is shown that young adults are increasing as a proportion of regional migrants; reaffirming academic representations of young adults as a highly mobile age group. Second, it is identified that migration flows decreased for age groups between 2002-2008, with the notable exception of 16-24 year olds. This suggests that young adults do not adhere to the increasing trend of non-migration, as individuals and households increasingly ‘stay-put’ due to detrimental socio-economic conditions (Cooke, 2011). Third, major regional differences between the migration flows of 16-24 year olds are observed, which beg questions about the escalator regions. The findings of the paper are pertinent to ongoing debates of population change, particularly given the reconfiguration of national policies (e.g. funding of higher education, housing benefit) is leading to new expressions of young adult migration
1473-3285
Sage, Joanna
9b9f43a4-6269-4ea4-bd63-2ebfec6bd40a
Smith, Darren P.
f599893a-36d7-46a9-9d03-64b1e7147ed4
Sage, Joanna
9b9f43a4-6269-4ea4-bd63-2ebfec6bd40a
Smith, Darren P.
f599893a-36d7-46a9-9d03-64b1e7147ed4

Sage, Joanna and Smith, Darren P. (2013) The regional migration of young adults in England and Wales (2002-08): a ‘conveyor-belt’ of population redistribution? Children's Geographies. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper calls for a more encompassing perspective of the regional migration patterns of young adults (16-24), extending studies of labour-motivated graduate migration. It is argued the long-distance movement(s) of young adults per se is a leading constituent of demographic and population changes in society; emphasising the connections between youthful stages of the lifecourse and high levels of population mobility that include students, graduates and other sub-groups. Using revised NHSCR data to interrogate regional migration flows in England and Wales (2002-2008), our descriptive analyses reveal three key findings. First, it is shown that young adults are increasing as a proportion of regional migrants; reaffirming academic representations of young adults as a highly mobile age group. Second, it is identified that migration flows decreased for age groups between 2002-2008, with the notable exception of 16-24 year olds. This suggests that young adults do not adhere to the increasing trend of non-migration, as individuals and households increasingly ‘stay-put’ due to detrimental socio-economic conditions (Cooke, 2011). Third, major regional differences between the migration flows of 16-24 year olds are observed, which beg questions about the escalator regions. The findings of the paper are pertinent to ongoing debates of population change, particularly given the reconfiguration of national policies (e.g. funding of higher education, housing benefit) is leading to new expressions of young adult migration

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2013
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349529
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349529
ISSN: 1473-3285
PURE UUID: e9ed2988-b1ce-4f04-82f2-e095a5bad2c3

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Date deposited: 07 Mar 2013 08:29
Last modified: 08 Nov 2021 23:40

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Contributors

Author: Joanna Sage
Author: Darren P. Smith

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