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Theory and preliminary measurements of the Rayleigh-like collapse of a conical bubble

Theory and preliminary measurements of the Rayleigh-like collapse of a conical bubble
Theory and preliminary measurements of the Rayleigh-like collapse of a conical bubble
Key to the dynamics of the type of bubble collapse which is associated with such phenomena as sonoluminesence, and the emission of strong rebound pressures into the liquid, is the role of the liquid inertia. Following the initial formulation of the collapse of an empty spherical cavity, such collapses have been termed 'Rayleigh-like', and today this type of cavitation is termed 'inertial', reflecting the dominant role of the liquid inertia in the early stages of the collapse. Whilst the inertia in models where, at these early stages, spherical symmetry can be assumed can depend primarily on the liquid density, experimental control of the liquid inertia has not readily been achievable without changing the liquid density, and consequently changing other liquid properties. In this text, novel experimental apparatus is described whereby the inertia at the early stages of the collapse of a conical bubble can easily be controlled. The collapse is capable of producing sonoluminescence. The similarity between the collapse of spherical and conical bubbles is investigated analytically, and compared with experimental measurements of the pressures generated by the collapse
1610-1928
1014-1024
Leighton, T.G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Phelps, A.D.
3f987d72-7fdd-4282-9a58-9ec5f9effcf2
Cox, B.T.
ea093bea-c2c7-413b-8a6a-3261f5e877e1
Ho, W.L.
cd6aa5ba-ffbe-41e8-a847-82cf2da6a071
Leighton, T.G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Phelps, A.D.
3f987d72-7fdd-4282-9a58-9ec5f9effcf2
Cox, B.T.
ea093bea-c2c7-413b-8a6a-3261f5e877e1
Ho, W.L.
cd6aa5ba-ffbe-41e8-a847-82cf2da6a071

Leighton, T.G., Phelps, A.D., Cox, B.T. and Ho, W.L. (1998) Theory and preliminary measurements of the Rayleigh-like collapse of a conical bubble. Acta Acustica united with Acustica, 84 (6), 1014-1024.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Key to the dynamics of the type of bubble collapse which is associated with such phenomena as sonoluminesence, and the emission of strong rebound pressures into the liquid, is the role of the liquid inertia. Following the initial formulation of the collapse of an empty spherical cavity, such collapses have been termed 'Rayleigh-like', and today this type of cavitation is termed 'inertial', reflecting the dominant role of the liquid inertia in the early stages of the collapse. Whilst the inertia in models where, at these early stages, spherical symmetry can be assumed can depend primarily on the liquid density, experimental control of the liquid inertia has not readily been achievable without changing the liquid density, and consequently changing other liquid properties. In this text, novel experimental apparatus is described whereby the inertia at the early stages of the collapse of a conical bubble can easily be controlled. The collapse is capable of producing sonoluminescence. The similarity between the collapse of spherical and conical bubbles is investigated analytically, and compared with experimental measurements of the pressures generated by the collapse

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Published date: 1998
Organisations: Acoustics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349549
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349549
ISSN: 1610-1928
PURE UUID: a7f9159b-0d22-4a7e-b915-c43381ff8bbc
ORCID for T.G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

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Date deposited: 07 Mar 2013 14:31
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:08

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