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Ultrasonic propagation in cancellous bone: a new stratified model

Ultrasonic propagation in cancellous bone: a new stratified model
Ultrasonic propagation in cancellous bone: a new stratified model
The theoretical modeling of ultrasonic propagation in cancellous bone is pertinent to improving the ultrasonic diagnosis of osteoporosis. First, this paper reviews applications of Biot’s theory to this problem. Next, a new approach is presented, based on an idealization of cancellous bone as a periodic array of bone-marrow layers. Schoenberg’s theory is applied to this model to predict wave properties. Bovine bone samples were tested in vitro using pulses centered at 1 MHz over various angles relative to the orientated cancellous structure. Two longitudinal modes (fast and slow waves) were observed for propagation parallel to the structure, but only one was observed for propagation normal to the structure. Angular-dependence of velocities was examined, and the fast wave was found to be strongly anisotropic. These results gave qualitative agreement with predictions of Schoenberg’s theory. Although this new model is a simplification of the cancellous architecture, it has potential for future research
0301-5629
811-821
Hughes, Elinor Ruth
91e0a117-2014-452b-ac31-6fd7ddbb7b29
Leighton, Timothy Grant
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Petley, Graham William
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
White, Paul Robert
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Hughes, Elinor Ruth
91e0a117-2014-452b-ac31-6fd7ddbb7b29
Leighton, Timothy Grant
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Petley, Graham William
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
White, Paul Robert
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba

Hughes, Elinor Ruth, Leighton, Timothy Grant, Petley, Graham William and White, Paul Robert (1999) Ultrasonic propagation in cancellous bone: a new stratified model. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 25 (5), 811-821. (doi:10.1016/S0301-5629(99)00034-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The theoretical modeling of ultrasonic propagation in cancellous bone is pertinent to improving the ultrasonic diagnosis of osteoporosis. First, this paper reviews applications of Biot’s theory to this problem. Next, a new approach is presented, based on an idealization of cancellous bone as a periodic array of bone-marrow layers. Schoenberg’s theory is applied to this model to predict wave properties. Bovine bone samples were tested in vitro using pulses centered at 1 MHz over various angles relative to the orientated cancellous structure. Two longitudinal modes (fast and slow waves) were observed for propagation parallel to the structure, but only one was observed for propagation normal to the structure. Angular-dependence of velocities was examined, and the fast wave was found to be strongly anisotropic. These results gave qualitative agreement with predictions of Schoenberg’s theory. Although this new model is a simplification of the cancellous architecture, it has potential for future research

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Published date: June 1999
Organisations: Acoustics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349550
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349550
ISSN: 0301-5629
PURE UUID: b9dcb389-aa46-488c-8041-69912738f496
ORCID for Timothy Grant Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Graham William Petley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3295-0444
ORCID for Paul Robert White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713

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Date deposited: 07 Mar 2013 15:15
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 02:05

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