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A wave finite element analysis of the passive cochlea

A wave finite element analysis of the passive cochlea
A wave finite element analysis of the passive cochlea
Current models of the cochlea can be characterized as being either based on the assumed propagation of a single slow wave, which provides good insight, or involve the solution of a numerical model, such as in the finite element method, which allows the incorporation of more detailed anatomical features. In this paper it is shown how the wave finite element method can be used to decompose the results of a finite element calculation in terms of wave components, which allows the insight of the wave approach to be brought to bear on more complicated numerical models. In order to illustrate the method, a simple box model is considered, of a passive, locally reacting, basilar membrane interacting via three-dimensional fluid coupling. An analytic formulation of the dispersion equation is used initially to illustrate the types of wave one would expect in such a model. The wave finite element is then used to calculate the wavenumbers of all the waves in the finite element model. It is shown that only a single wave type dominates the response until this peaks at the best place in the cochlea, where an evanescent, higher order fluid wave can make a significant contribution.
0001-4966
1535-1545
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Ni, Guangjian
f6ddc112-7d81-403a-b97a-7ecbc8fd4e59
Mace, Brian R.
cfb883c3-2211-4f3a-b7f3-d5beb9baaefe
Lineton, Ben
1ace4e96-34da-4fc4-bc17-a1d82b2ba0e2
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Ni, Guangjian
f6ddc112-7d81-403a-b97a-7ecbc8fd4e59
Mace, Brian R.
cfb883c3-2211-4f3a-b7f3-d5beb9baaefe
Lineton, Ben
1ace4e96-34da-4fc4-bc17-a1d82b2ba0e2

Elliott, Stephen J., Ni, Guangjian, Mace, Brian R. and Lineton, Ben (2013) A wave finite element analysis of the passive cochlea. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 133 (3), 1535-1545. (doi:10.1121/1.4790350). (PMID:23464024)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Current models of the cochlea can be characterized as being either based on the assumed propagation of a single slow wave, which provides good insight, or involve the solution of a numerical model, such as in the finite element method, which allows the incorporation of more detailed anatomical features. In this paper it is shown how the wave finite element method can be used to decompose the results of a finite element calculation in terms of wave components, which allows the insight of the wave approach to be brought to bear on more complicated numerical models. In order to illustrate the method, a simple box model is considered, of a passive, locally reacting, basilar membrane interacting via three-dimensional fluid coupling. An analytic formulation of the dispersion equation is used initially to illustrate the types of wave one would expect in such a model. The wave finite element is then used to calculate the wavenumbers of all the waves in the finite element model. It is shown that only a single wave type dominates the response until this peaks at the best place in the cochlea, where an evanescent, higher order fluid wave can make a significant contribution.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 January 2013
Published date: February 2013
Organisations: Human Sciences Group, Signal Processing & Control Grp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349711
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349711
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 4d14c2a8-9e68-488e-9602-6e3b1722f412
ORCID for Guangjian Ni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9240-3020
ORCID for Brian R. Mace: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3312-4918

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Mar 2013 11:41
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:06

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Contributors

Author: Guangjian Ni ORCID iD
Author: Brian R. Mace ORCID iD
Author: Ben Lineton

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