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An integrated finite-element approach to mechanics, transport and biosynthesis in tissue engineering

An integrated finite-element approach to mechanics, transport and biosynthesis in tissue engineering
An integrated finite-element approach to mechanics, transport and biosynthesis in tissue engineering
A finite-element approach was formulated, aimed at enabling an integrated study of mechanical and biochemical factors that control the functional development of tissue engineered constructs. A nonlinear biphasic displacement-velocity-pressure description was combined with adjective and diffusive solute transport, uptake and biosynthesis. To illustrate the approach we focused on the synthesis and transport of macromolecules under influence of fluid flow induced by cyclic compression. In order to produce net transport the effect of dispersion was investigated. An abstract representation of biosynthesis was employed, three cases were distinguished: Synthesis dependent on a limited small solute, synthesis dependent on a limited large solute and synthesis independent of solute transport. Results show that a dispersion model can account for augmented solute transport by cyclic compression and indicate the different sensitivity to loading that can be expected depending on the size of the limiting solute.
0148-0731
82-91
Sengers, Bram G.
d6b771b1-4ede-48c5-9644-fa86503941aa
Oomens, Cees W.
12b2046f-3a4e-4b14-b1d0-77d48333197a
Baaijens, Frank P.
a82573a3-fb7c-4aa8-8d1f-a1977a1eabca
Sengers, Bram G.
d6b771b1-4ede-48c5-9644-fa86503941aa
Oomens, Cees W.
12b2046f-3a4e-4b14-b1d0-77d48333197a
Baaijens, Frank P.
a82573a3-fb7c-4aa8-8d1f-a1977a1eabca

Sengers, Bram G., Oomens, Cees W. and Baaijens, Frank P. (2004) An integrated finite-element approach to mechanics, transport and biosynthesis in tissue engineering. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 126 (1), 82-91. (doi:10.1115/1.1645526). (PMID:15171133)

Record type: Article

Abstract

A finite-element approach was formulated, aimed at enabling an integrated study of mechanical and biochemical factors that control the functional development of tissue engineered constructs. A nonlinear biphasic displacement-velocity-pressure description was combined with adjective and diffusive solute transport, uptake and biosynthesis. To illustrate the approach we focused on the synthesis and transport of macromolecules under influence of fluid flow induced by cyclic compression. In order to produce net transport the effect of dispersion was investigated. An abstract representation of biosynthesis was employed, three cases were distinguished: Synthesis dependent on a limited small solute, synthesis dependent on a limited large solute and synthesis independent of solute transport. Results show that a dispersion model can account for augmented solute transport by cyclic compression and indicate the different sensitivity to loading that can be expected depending on the size of the limiting solute.

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Published date: 9 March 2004
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349742
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349742
ISSN: 0148-0731
PURE UUID: 1abb403a-ba50-4f1e-bcb8-24cdecc6e6f1
ORCID for Bram G. Sengers: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5859-6984

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Date deposited: 12 Mar 2013 14:19
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Bram G. Sengers ORCID iD
Author: Cees W. Oomens
Author: Frank P. Baaijens

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