The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Reflections on a British 're-civilising' mission: Sarah (Bowdich) Lee's "Playing at Settlers, or the Faggot House"

Reflections on a British 're-civilising' mission: Sarah (Bowdich) Lee's "Playing at Settlers, or the Faggot House"
Reflections on a British 're-civilising' mission: Sarah (Bowdich) Lee's "Playing at Settlers, or the Faggot House"
Imperial and colonial juvenile literature is assumed to be 'an excellent reflector of the dominant ideas of an age' (Mackenzie). This article by contrast argues for a less mimetic view through close reading of Mrs R. Lee's 'Playing at Settlers, or the Faggot House' (1855), particularly its unfinished critiques of high colojialism from within. The actions of its enlightened British juvenile protagonists to educate their peers, and adult interlocutors, makes this text 'settler' and 'Robinsonade' fiction with a difference, as much for Britons at home as for those overseas. The tensions, cultural specificities and multi-colonial dimensions of the text explored in this article then suggest avenues for firther research on juvenile works for the period, whether British or other European. Recovery of other similar, yet forgotten, works for children not only invites more informed reappraisal of them, but also of over-zealous postcolonial readings of the 'civilising mission' that have denies vociferous counter-colonial voices in juvenile, next-generational form.
playing at settlers, juvenile colonial fiction, australia, settlers robinsonade
1755-6198
135-150
Orr, Mary
3eec40eb-479c-4c9a-b2da-7388a27f9d5c
Orr, Mary
3eec40eb-479c-4c9a-b2da-7388a27f9d5c

Orr, Mary (2012) Reflections on a British 're-civilising' mission: Sarah (Bowdich) Lee's "Playing at Settlers, or the Faggot House". International Research in Children's Literature, 5 (2), 135-150. (doi:10.3366/ircl.2012.0059).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Imperial and colonial juvenile literature is assumed to be 'an excellent reflector of the dominant ideas of an age' (Mackenzie). This article by contrast argues for a less mimetic view through close reading of Mrs R. Lee's 'Playing at Settlers, or the Faggot House' (1855), particularly its unfinished critiques of high colojialism from within. The actions of its enlightened British juvenile protagonists to educate their peers, and adult interlocutors, makes this text 'settler' and 'Robinsonade' fiction with a difference, as much for Britons at home as for those overseas. The tensions, cultural specificities and multi-colonial dimensions of the text explored in this article then suggest avenues for firther research on juvenile works for the period, whether British or other European. Recovery of other similar, yet forgotten, works for children not only invites more informed reappraisal of them, but also of over-zealous postcolonial readings of the 'civilising mission' that have denies vociferous counter-colonial voices in juvenile, next-generational form.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: December 2012
Published date: December 2012
Keywords: playing at settlers, juvenile colonial fiction, australia, settlers robinsonade
Organisations: Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349817
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349817
ISSN: 1755-6198
PURE UUID: 5ad40ded-ac77-4dc1-92ef-6d4184f0a255

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Mar 2013 09:55
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×