The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Microbial nitrogen cycling processes in oxygen minimum zones

Microbial nitrogen cycling processes in oxygen minimum zones
Microbial nitrogen cycling processes in oxygen minimum zones
Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) harbor unique microbial communities that rely on alternative electron acceptors for respiration. Conditions therein enable an almost complete nitrogen (N) cycle and substantial N-loss. N-loss in OMZs is attributable to anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, whereas nitrate reduction to nitrite along with dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium are major remineralization pathways. Despite virtually anoxic conditions, nitrification also occurs in OMZs, converting remineralized ammonium to N-oxides. The concurrence of all these processes provides a direct channel from organic N to the ultimate N-loss, whereas most individual processes are likely controlled by organic matter. Many microorganisms inhabiting the OMZs are capable of multiple functions in the N- and other elemental cycles. Their versatile metabolic potentials versus actual activities present a challenge to ecophysiological and biogeochemical measurements. These challenges need to be tackled before we can realistically predict how N-cycling in OMZs, and thus oceanic N-balance, will respond to future global perturbations.
1941-1405
317-345
Lam, Phyllis
996aef80-a15d-4827-aed8-1b97b378f6ad
Kuypers, Marcel M.M.
b6288cfb-42bc-469c-93fe-8fbb40d97bec
Lam, Phyllis
996aef80-a15d-4827-aed8-1b97b378f6ad
Kuypers, Marcel M.M.
b6288cfb-42bc-469c-93fe-8fbb40d97bec

Lam, Phyllis and Kuypers, Marcel M.M. (2011) Microbial nitrogen cycling processes in oxygen minimum zones. Annual Review of Marine Science, 3 (1), 317-345. (doi:10.1146/annurev-marine-120709-142814). (PMID:21329208)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) harbor unique microbial communities that rely on alternative electron acceptors for respiration. Conditions therein enable an almost complete nitrogen (N) cycle and substantial N-loss. N-loss in OMZs is attributable to anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, whereas nitrate reduction to nitrite along with dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium are major remineralization pathways. Despite virtually anoxic conditions, nitrification also occurs in OMZs, converting remineralized ammonium to N-oxides. The concurrence of all these processes provides a direct channel from organic N to the ultimate N-loss, whereas most individual processes are likely controlled by organic matter. Many microorganisms inhabiting the OMZs are capable of multiple functions in the N- and other elemental cycles. Their versatile metabolic potentials versus actual activities present a challenge to ecophysiological and biogeochemical measurements. These challenges need to be tackled before we can realistically predict how N-cycling in OMZs, and thus oceanic N-balance, will respond to future global perturbations.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 27 September 2010
Published date: January 2011
Organisations: Ocean Biochemistry & Ecosystems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 349912
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/349912
ISSN: 1941-1405
PURE UUID: 7baa2966-c91e-4ad5-a2c3-58b8072274a2
ORCID for Phyllis Lam: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2067-171X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Mar 2013 13:34
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×