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Is sea level rise accelerating in the Chesapeake Bay? a demonstration of a novel new approach for analyzing sea level data

Is sea level rise accelerating in the Chesapeake Bay? a demonstration of a novel new approach for analyzing sea level data
Is sea level rise accelerating in the Chesapeake Bay? a demonstration of a novel new approach for analyzing sea level data
Sea level data from the Chesapeake Bay are used to test a novel new analysis method for studies of sea level rise (SLR). The method, based on Empirical Mode Decomposition and Hilbert-Huang Transformation, separates the sea level trend from other oscillating modes and reveals how the mean sea level changes over time. Bootstrap calculations test the robustness of the method and provide confidence levels. The analysis shows that rates of SLR have increased from ~1–3 mm y-1 in the 1930s to ~4–10 mm y-1 in 2011, an acceleration of ~0.05–0.10 mm y-2 that is larger than most previous studies, but comparable to recent findings by Sallenger and collaborators. While land subsidence increases SLR rates in the bay relative to global SLR, the acceleration results support Sallenger et al.’s proposition that an additional contribution to SLR from climatic changes in ocean circulation is affecting the region.
0094-8276
[6pp.]
Ezer, Tal
ca5772f0-406b-45ca-b105-648bd15efa8c
Corlett, William Bryce
a8cc833e-e0f3-44c0-a2c9-18114abd13a3
Ezer, Tal
ca5772f0-406b-45ca-b105-648bd15efa8c
Corlett, William Bryce
a8cc833e-e0f3-44c0-a2c9-18114abd13a3

Ezer, Tal and Corlett, William Bryce (2012) Is sea level rise accelerating in the Chesapeake Bay? a demonstration of a novel new approach for analyzing sea level data. Geophysical Research Letters, 39 (19), [6pp.]. (doi:10.1029/2012GL053435).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Sea level data from the Chesapeake Bay are used to test a novel new analysis method for studies of sea level rise (SLR). The method, based on Empirical Mode Decomposition and Hilbert-Huang Transformation, separates the sea level trend from other oscillating modes and reveals how the mean sea level changes over time. Bootstrap calculations test the robustness of the method and provide confidence levels. The analysis shows that rates of SLR have increased from ~1–3 mm y-1 in the 1930s to ~4–10 mm y-1 in 2011, an acceleration of ~0.05–0.10 mm y-2 that is larger than most previous studies, but comparable to recent findings by Sallenger and collaborators. While land subsidence increases SLR rates in the bay relative to global SLR, the acceleration results support Sallenger et al.’s proposition that an additional contribution to SLR from climatic changes in ocean circulation is affecting the region.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 4 October 2012
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 350186
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350186
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 5f21bc80-61e5-440b-9b5b-bcd1706bfb21

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Date deposited: 19 Mar 2013 14:07
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 07:25

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Author: Tal Ezer
Author: William Bryce Corlett

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