The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Representation, agendas and institutions

Representation, agendas and institutions
Representation, agendas and institutions
Dynamic agenda representation can be understood through the transmission of the priorities of the public onto the policy priorities of government. The pattern of representation in policy agendas is mediated through institutions due to friction (that is, organizational and cognitive costs imposed on change) in decision-making and variation in the scarcity of policy-makers’ attention. The paper builds on extant studies of the correspondence between public priorities and the policy activities of government, undertaking time series analyses using data for the US and the UK, from 1951 to 2003, relating to executive speeches, laws and budgets in combination with data on public opinion about the ‘most important problem’. The results show that the responsiveness of policy agendas to public priorities is greater when institutions are subject to less friction (i.e. executive speeches subject to few formal rules and involving a limited number of actors) and declines as friction against policy change increases (i.e. laws and budgets subject to a greater number of veto points and political interests/coalitions).
0304-4130
37-56
Bevan, Shaun
3142fa60-e99e-4f65-8ece-37cea21799cf
Jennings, Will
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Bevan, Shaun
3142fa60-e99e-4f65-8ece-37cea21799cf
Jennings, Will
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7

Bevan, Shaun and Jennings, Will (2014) Representation, agendas and institutions. European Journal of Political Research, 53 (1), 37-56. (doi:10.1111/1475-6765.12023).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dynamic agenda representation can be understood through the transmission of the priorities of the public onto the policy priorities of government. The pattern of representation in policy agendas is mediated through institutions due to friction (that is, organizational and cognitive costs imposed on change) in decision-making and variation in the scarcity of policy-makers’ attention. The paper builds on extant studies of the correspondence between public priorities and the policy activities of government, undertaking time series analyses using data for the US and the UK, from 1951 to 2003, relating to executive speeches, laws and budgets in combination with data on public opinion about the ‘most important problem’. The results show that the responsiveness of policy agendas to public priorities is greater when institutions are subject to less friction (i.e. executive speeches subject to few formal rules and involving a limited number of actors) and declines as friction against policy change increases (i.e. laws and budgets subject to a greater number of veto points and political interests/coalitions).

Text
BevanJenningsEJPR FINAL.pdf - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 16 April 2013
Published date: 7 January 2014
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 350408
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350408
ISSN: 0304-4130
PURE UUID: 21353415-91fb-4de4-9bd6-a1bc15091cdc
ORCID for Will Jennings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9007-8896

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2013 14:17
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:06

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Shaun Bevan
Author: Will Jennings ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×