The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Multiple regimes of air-sea carbon partitioning identified from constant-alkalinity buffer factors

Multiple regimes of air-sea carbon partitioning identified from constant-alkalinity buffer factors
Multiple regimes of air-sea carbon partitioning identified from constant-alkalinity buffer factors
Numerical studies have indicated that the steady-state ocean-atmosphere partitioning of carbon will change profoundly as emissions continue. In particular, the globally averaged Revelle buffer factor will first increase and then decrease at higher emissions. Furthermore, atmospheric carbon will initially grow exponentially with emission size, after which it will depend linearly on emissions at higher emission totals. In this article, we explain this behavior by means of an analytical theory based on simple carbonate chemistry. A cornerstone of the theory is a newly defined dimensionless factor, O. We show that the qualitative changes are connected with different regimes in ocean chemistry: if the air-sea partitioning of carbon is determined by the carbonate ion, then the Revelle factor increases with emissions, whereas the buffer factor decreases with emission size, when dissolved carbon dioxide determines the partitioning. Currently, the ocean carbonate chemistry is dominated by the carbonate ion response, but at high total emissions, the response of dissolved carbon dioxide takes on this role.
carbon emission, carbon partitioning, carbon pumps, revelle factor
0886-6236
GB3008-[9pp]
Omta, Anne Willem
d554153f-9f28-4eba-985f-d9d1de727526
Goodwin, Philip
87dbb154-5c39-473a-8121-c794487ee1fd
Follows, Michael J.
12c723bc-f2f8-43f4-a309-bff6885b9c7c
Omta, Anne Willem
d554153f-9f28-4eba-985f-d9d1de727526
Goodwin, Philip
87dbb154-5c39-473a-8121-c794487ee1fd
Follows, Michael J.
12c723bc-f2f8-43f4-a309-bff6885b9c7c

Omta, Anne Willem, Goodwin, Philip and Follows, Michael J. (2010) Multiple regimes of air-sea carbon partitioning identified from constant-alkalinity buffer factors. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 24 (3), GB3008-[9pp]. (doi:10.1029/2009GB003726).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Numerical studies have indicated that the steady-state ocean-atmosphere partitioning of carbon will change profoundly as emissions continue. In particular, the globally averaged Revelle buffer factor will first increase and then decrease at higher emissions. Furthermore, atmospheric carbon will initially grow exponentially with emission size, after which it will depend linearly on emissions at higher emission totals. In this article, we explain this behavior by means of an analytical theory based on simple carbonate chemistry. A cornerstone of the theory is a newly defined dimensionless factor, O. We show that the qualitative changes are connected with different regimes in ocean chemistry: if the air-sea partitioning of carbon is determined by the carbonate ion, then the Revelle factor increases with emissions, whereas the buffer factor decreases with emission size, when dissolved carbon dioxide determines the partitioning. Currently, the ocean carbonate chemistry is dominated by the carbonate ion response, but at high total emissions, the response of dissolved carbon dioxide takes on this role.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 22 July 2010
Published date: September 2010
Keywords: carbon emission, carbon partitioning, carbon pumps, revelle factor
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 350507
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350507
ISSN: 0886-6236
PURE UUID: a75bb123-8ef8-40e5-9d8e-529166a6f8e3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2013 10:05
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:39

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×