The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Children’s home lives in the context of parental migration in South Africa

Children’s home lives in the context of parental migration in South Africa
Children’s home lives in the context of parental migration in South Africa
The dispersal of parents and siblings between multiple households is a commonplace experience for many children in SouthAfrica. The conditions and experiences of children living apart from their migrant parents have long been a source of concern for researchers, government and non-governmental organisations. Few sources of empirical data are available that adequately allow us to situate childhood experiences within the context of changing parental circumstances including work, migration, cohabitation, relationship stability and parental death. This paper explores the social and residential dynamics of migrant parents and their children in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa using detailed, longitudinal data about members of rural households in a demographic surveillance population, and a linked sample survey of adult migrants. We describe the migratory and residential experiences, and socio-demographic characteristics of 236 migrant parents and 460 of their biological children (less than 18 years) reported in surveillance or survey interviews. One quarter of the migrant parents reported at least one child as being a member of both their destination and origin households. The majority of parents (72%; 67% of mothers and 84% of fathers, p<.05) did not report any of their children as members of their destination household. Thirty percent of these 'left-behind' children were resident locally but were not living in the 'origin' household of their migrant parent. We explore factors associated with types of dispersed family arrangements and the extent of children's residential stability by age. These findings contribute to understanding the dynamic and multiple spaces in which children and their parents live.
Bennett, R.
53222607-43bd-46d3-9448-1599fd785ac0
Hosegood, V.
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Newell, M.L.
c6ff99dd-c23b-4fef-a846-a221fe2522b3
McGrath, N.
b75c0232-24ec-443f-93a9-69e9e12dc961
Bennett, R.
53222607-43bd-46d3-9448-1599fd785ac0
Hosegood, V.
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Newell, M.L.
c6ff99dd-c23b-4fef-a846-a221fe2522b3
McGrath, N.
b75c0232-24ec-443f-93a9-69e9e12dc961

Bennett, R., Hosegood, V., Newell, M.L. and McGrath, N. (2011) Children’s home lives in the context of parental migration in South Africa. British Society for Population Studies (BSPS) Conference, United Kingdom. 07 - 09 Sep 2011.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The dispersal of parents and siblings between multiple households is a commonplace experience for many children in SouthAfrica. The conditions and experiences of children living apart from their migrant parents have long been a source of concern for researchers, government and non-governmental organisations. Few sources of empirical data are available that adequately allow us to situate childhood experiences within the context of changing parental circumstances including work, migration, cohabitation, relationship stability and parental death. This paper explores the social and residential dynamics of migrant parents and their children in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa using detailed, longitudinal data about members of rural households in a demographic surveillance population, and a linked sample survey of adult migrants. We describe the migratory and residential experiences, and socio-demographic characteristics of 236 migrant parents and 460 of their biological children (less than 18 years) reported in surveillance or survey interviews. One quarter of the migrant parents reported at least one child as being a member of both their destination and origin households. The majority of parents (72%; 67% of mothers and 84% of fathers, p<.05) did not report any of their children as members of their destination household. Thirty percent of these 'left-behind' children were resident locally but were not living in the 'origin' household of their migrant parent. We explore factors associated with types of dispersed family arrangements and the extent of children's residential stability by age. These findings contribute to understanding the dynamic and multiple spaces in which children and their parents live.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2011
Venue - Dates: British Society for Population Studies (BSPS) Conference, United Kingdom, 2011-09-07 - 2011-09-09
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 350688
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350688
PURE UUID: a010531e-d190-4f01-b948-25ba44add38d
ORCID for V. Hosegood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2244-2518
ORCID for M.L. Newell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1074-7699
ORCID for N. McGrath: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1039-0159

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Mar 2013 12:25
Last modified: 24 May 2019 00:31

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×