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Implications of sperm banking for health-related quality of life up to 1 year after cancer diagnosis

Implications of sperm banking for health-related quality of life up to 1 year after cancer diagnosis
Implications of sperm banking for health-related quality of life up to 1 year after cancer diagnosis
Background: Sperm banking is recommended for all men diagnosed with cancer where treatment is associated with risk of longterm gonadatoxicity, to offer the opportunity of fatherhood and improved quality of life. However, uptake of sperm banking is lower than expected and little is known about why men refuse. Our aims were to determine: (i) demographic and medical variables associated with decisions about banking and (ii) differences in quality of life between bankers and non-bankers at diagnosis (Time 1 (T1)) and 1 year later (Time 2 (T2)).

Methods: Questionnaires were completed by 91 men (response rate¼86.67%) at T1 and 78 (85.71% response rate) at T2.

Results: In all, 44 (56.41%) banked sperm. They were younger and less likely to have children than non-bankers. In a subset of men who were not sure if they wanted children in the future (n¼36), 24 banked sperm. Among this group, those who banked were younger, more satisfied with clinic appointments and less worried about the health of future children. At T2, there were no differences in quality of life between bankers and non-bankers.

Conclusion: For those who are uncertain about future reproductive plans, decisions depend on their health on diagnosis and satisfaction with clinic care. We conclude that extra care should be taken in counselling younger men who may have given little consideration to future parenting. Results support previous findings that the role of the doctor is vital in facilitating decisions, especially for those who are undecided about whether they wanted children in the future or not.
0007-0920
1004-1011
Pacey, Allan
417e31bd-db05-459e-9342-1fa0547cdf18
Merrick, Hannah
8baabc58-42b4-405b-8629-1af4dd218869
Arden-Close, Emily
476eebfb-e256-474b-8351-09db1efdeab5
Morris, Kate
cc578595-2fe4-4ded-8a8a-78aef3959025
Rowe, Richard
64a2e9f0-c6fa-4b8e-ae1a-179bb93a8819
Stark, Daniel
a79eb009-e5d5-46a2-b079-41b313dbd815
Eiser, Christine
ee840c03-619d-4559-a971-e7a001fe360b
Pacey, Allan
417e31bd-db05-459e-9342-1fa0547cdf18
Merrick, Hannah
8baabc58-42b4-405b-8629-1af4dd218869
Arden-Close, Emily
476eebfb-e256-474b-8351-09db1efdeab5
Morris, Kate
cc578595-2fe4-4ded-8a8a-78aef3959025
Rowe, Richard
64a2e9f0-c6fa-4b8e-ae1a-179bb93a8819
Stark, Daniel
a79eb009-e5d5-46a2-b079-41b313dbd815
Eiser, Christine
ee840c03-619d-4559-a971-e7a001fe360b

Pacey, Allan, Merrick, Hannah, Arden-Close, Emily, Morris, Kate, Rowe, Richard, Stark, Daniel and Eiser, Christine (2013) Implications of sperm banking for health-related quality of life up to 1 year after cancer diagnosis. British Journal of Cancer, 108 (5), 1004-1011. (doi:10.1038/bjc.2013.57). (PMID:23470465)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Sperm banking is recommended for all men diagnosed with cancer where treatment is associated with risk of longterm gonadatoxicity, to offer the opportunity of fatherhood and improved quality of life. However, uptake of sperm banking is lower than expected and little is known about why men refuse. Our aims were to determine: (i) demographic and medical variables associated with decisions about banking and (ii) differences in quality of life between bankers and non-bankers at diagnosis (Time 1 (T1)) and 1 year later (Time 2 (T2)).

Methods: Questionnaires were completed by 91 men (response rate¼86.67%) at T1 and 78 (85.71% response rate) at T2.

Results: In all, 44 (56.41%) banked sperm. They were younger and less likely to have children than non-bankers. In a subset of men who were not sure if they wanted children in the future (n¼36), 24 banked sperm. Among this group, those who banked were younger, more satisfied with clinic appointments and less worried about the health of future children. At T2, there were no differences in quality of life between bankers and non-bankers.

Conclusion: For those who are uncertain about future reproductive plans, decisions depend on their health on diagnosis and satisfaction with clinic care. We conclude that extra care should be taken in counselling younger men who may have given little consideration to future parenting. Results support previous findings that the role of the doctor is vital in facilitating decisions, especially for those who are undecided about whether they wanted children in the future or not.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 7 March 2013

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Local EPrints ID: 350715
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350715
ISSN: 0007-0920
PURE UUID: db548c94-e404-4c27-aac3-dae07de5d0cf

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Date deposited: 28 Mar 2013 15:47
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:39

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Contributors

Author: Allan Pacey
Author: Hannah Merrick
Author: Emily Arden-Close
Author: Kate Morris
Author: Richard Rowe
Author: Daniel Stark
Author: Christine Eiser

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