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Qualities of a royal minister: studies in the rise of Thomas Cromwell, c. 1520-1534

Qualities of a royal minister: studies in the rise of Thomas Cromwell, c. 1520-1534
Qualities of a royal minister: studies in the rise of Thomas Cromwell, c. 1520-1534
Existing studies of Thomas Cromwell (c. 1485-1540) have typically interpreted his life and work during the 1530s as being a reflection of his religious beliefs, his administrative zeal or his political ambitions. In doing so they have left a distorted picture of the man and his career, which often takes for granted exactly how he became the king’s leading minister. The purpose of this thesis is to describe how Cromwell rose so spectacularly, by examining previously neglected areas of work he undertook for the king, and presenting the first rounded study of Cromwell and his early career.

A new study of Cromwell, which focuses on aspects of his life and work which have never before been examined, enables new insights to be drawn about the minister himself, while shedding fresh light on debate surrounding Henrician Court and government. An examination of Cromwell’s greatly neglected life as a lawyer and merchant in the 1520s demonstrates how he acquired many of the qualities which were required for him to prosper under Henry VIII, while fresh consideration of the manner of Cromwell’s transition into the king’s service challenges the longstanding belief about how and when this occurred.

Despite the considerable evidence attesting to them in the State Papers, Cromwell’s earliest responsibilities for the king – those concerning the Crown lands and King’s Works, his management of the Church, and financing war with Scotland – have never before been examined. Doing so enables a new assessment of Cromwell’s early career to be drawn, which challenges the prevailing belief that the break with Rome was vital in his becoming chief minister.

Examination of Cromwell’s earliest activities in government then presents an intriguing perspective on Cromwell as an administrative reformer. And the first comprehensive account of his role in the Anglo-papal schism not only offers new insights into his role and influence over this, but questions the existing accounts of the politics of the 1530s.
Everett, M.
b0eb35bc-3420-4113-a369-fb12220569aa
Everett, M.
b0eb35bc-3420-4113-a369-fb12220569aa
Bernard, George
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Everett, M. (2013) Qualities of a royal minister: studies in the rise of Thomas Cromwell, c. 1520-1534. University of Southampton, Faculty of Humanities, Doctoral Thesis, 356pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Existing studies of Thomas Cromwell (c. 1485-1540) have typically interpreted his life and work during the 1530s as being a reflection of his religious beliefs, his administrative zeal or his political ambitions. In doing so they have left a distorted picture of the man and his career, which often takes for granted exactly how he became the king’s leading minister. The purpose of this thesis is to describe how Cromwell rose so spectacularly, by examining previously neglected areas of work he undertook for the king, and presenting the first rounded study of Cromwell and his early career.

A new study of Cromwell, which focuses on aspects of his life and work which have never before been examined, enables new insights to be drawn about the minister himself, while shedding fresh light on debate surrounding Henrician Court and government. An examination of Cromwell’s greatly neglected life as a lawyer and merchant in the 1520s demonstrates how he acquired many of the qualities which were required for him to prosper under Henry VIII, while fresh consideration of the manner of Cromwell’s transition into the king’s service challenges the longstanding belief about how and when this occurred.

Despite the considerable evidence attesting to them in the State Papers, Cromwell’s earliest responsibilities for the king – those concerning the Crown lands and King’s Works, his management of the Church, and financing war with Scotland – have never before been examined. Doing so enables a new assessment of Cromwell’s early career to be drawn, which challenges the prevailing belief that the break with Rome was vital in his becoming chief minister.

Examination of Cromwell’s earliest activities in government then presents an intriguing perspective on Cromwell as an administrative reformer. And the first comprehensive account of his role in the Anglo-papal schism not only offers new insights into his role and influence over this, but questions the existing accounts of the politics of the 1530s.

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Published date: 21 January 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, History

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Local EPrints ID: 350769
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350769
PURE UUID: 7d38fecf-c830-48f3-a986-c4970b5dea4f

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2013 13:17
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:31

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