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Applications of the Principles of Seismic Geomorphology to Continental-slope and Base-of-slope Systems: Case studies from seafloor and near-seafloor analogues

Applications of the Principles of Seismic Geomorphology to Continental-slope and Base-of-slope Systems: Case studies from seafloor and near-seafloor analogues
Applications of the Principles of Seismic Geomorphology to Continental-slope and Base-of-slope Systems: Case studies from seafloor and near-seafloor analogues
Description

Applications of the Principles of Seismic Geomorphology to Continental-slope and Base-of-slope Systems: Case studies from seafloor and near-seafloor analogues. The study of near-seafloor deepwater landscapes and the processes that form them are as important to the understanding of deeply buried marine depositional systems as the study of modern fluvial environments is to our understanding of ancient terrestrial depositional systems. In fact, these near-seafloor studies follow in the great tradition established by earlier clastic sedimentologists in the use of modern systems to understand ancient environments. The acquisition and mapping of exploration 3D seismic surveys over the last few decades allows for the study of seafloor geomorphology with a spatial resolution comparable to most deepwater multibeam bathymetric tools, and represents a significant advancement that can be used to push forward general understanding of slope and base-of-slope depositional systems through the application of the emerging science of seismic geomorphology. The papers assembled for this volume demonstrate the utility of seafloor-to-shallow subsurface data sets in studying the development of submarine landscapes and their affiliated sedimentary deposits. These contributions highlight the controls of slope morphology on patterns of both sedimentation and erosion. Many of the papers also highlight the influence of pre-existing seafloor relief on confining sediment-gravity flows specific transport pathways, thereby affecting subsequent evolution of the seafloor. The understanding of depositional processes that comes from studying deepwater analogue systems remains the best way take to knowledge from one basin or system and apply confidently to another for prediction and characterization of reservoirs for exploration and production of hydrocarbons.
99
SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology
Prather, Bradford E.
2129b370-48d1-42b3-a413-084a8f1cd676
Deptuck, Mark E.
94a3a2fb-03b3-40a4-bf72-efd5c33db378
Mohrig, David
4ced3084-77e3-40ec-acb8-0b612d0c2867
Van Hoorn, Berend
317fb135-8a4f-48c5-a148-35759327a9c8
Wynn, Russell B.
72ccd765-9240-45f8-9951-4552b497475a
Prather, Bradford E.
2129b370-48d1-42b3-a413-084a8f1cd676
Deptuck, Mark E.
94a3a2fb-03b3-40a4-bf72-efd5c33db378
Mohrig, David
4ced3084-77e3-40ec-acb8-0b612d0c2867
Van Hoorn, Berend
317fb135-8a4f-48c5-a148-35759327a9c8
Wynn, Russell B.
72ccd765-9240-45f8-9951-4552b497475a

Prather, Bradford E., Deptuck, Mark E., Mohrig, David, Van Hoorn, Berend and Wynn, Russell B. (eds.) (2012) Applications of the Principles of Seismic Geomorphology to Continental-slope and Base-of-slope Systems: Case studies from seafloor and near-seafloor analogues (SEPM Special Publication, 99), Tulsa, US. SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology

Record type: Book

Abstract

Description

Applications of the Principles of Seismic Geomorphology to Continental-slope and Base-of-slope Systems: Case studies from seafloor and near-seafloor analogues. The study of near-seafloor deepwater landscapes and the processes that form them are as important to the understanding of deeply buried marine depositional systems as the study of modern fluvial environments is to our understanding of ancient terrestrial depositional systems. In fact, these near-seafloor studies follow in the great tradition established by earlier clastic sedimentologists in the use of modern systems to understand ancient environments. The acquisition and mapping of exploration 3D seismic surveys over the last few decades allows for the study of seafloor geomorphology with a spatial resolution comparable to most deepwater multibeam bathymetric tools, and represents a significant advancement that can be used to push forward general understanding of slope and base-of-slope depositional systems through the application of the emerging science of seismic geomorphology. The papers assembled for this volume demonstrate the utility of seafloor-to-shallow subsurface data sets in studying the development of submarine landscapes and their affiliated sedimentary deposits. These contributions highlight the controls of slope morphology on patterns of both sedimentation and erosion. Many of the papers also highlight the influence of pre-existing seafloor relief on confining sediment-gravity flows specific transport pathways, thereby affecting subsequent evolution of the seafloor. The understanding of depositional processes that comes from studying deepwater analogue systems remains the best way take to knowledge from one basin or system and apply confidently to another for prediction and characterization of reservoirs for exploration and production of hydrocarbons.

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More information

Published date: April 2012
Organisations: Marine Geoscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 350802
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350802
PURE UUID: 13cccde4-3a93-4ca3-bb9e-5dfec0f69798

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Date deposited: 05 Apr 2013 14:30
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:31

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Contributors

Editor: Bradford E. Prather
Editor: Mark E. Deptuck
Editor: David Mohrig
Editor: Berend Van Hoorn
Editor: Russell B. Wynn

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