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Crop failure signals biodiversity crisis

Crop failure signals biodiversity crisis
Crop failure signals biodiversity crisis
Crop failures have pushed up food prices globally (Nature 472, 169; 2011). Human well-being depends on biodiversity and natural habitats as a source of food. Ironically, the countries harbouring these vital natural assets are also those currently facing the most severe food crises.

A report from the investment bank Nomura (http://go.nature.com/pwrlc9) introduces a global index for measuring nations' food vulnerability. The most vulnerable depend totally on imported food, and citizens spend more than one-third of their salaries on it.

Of the 35 most vulnerable countries, 15 contain tropical biodiversity hotspots. To produce more food, these countries may lease out their biodiversity-rich land to farm cash crops. Liberia, for example, intends to add 220,000 hectares of oil-palm plantation (http://go.nature.com/xblcjz) to its existing 1.6 million hectares of agricultural land in the southeast, one of the last strongholds of tropical forest in western Africa.

Vulnerable nations need better cooperation among governments to address the structural causes of imbalances in the international agricultural system; more research into new technologies that incorporate the food-production requirements of the rural poor; and stronger protection of natural systems by linking biodiversity preservation to increased food security.
0028-0836
284
Peh, Kelvin S-H
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Peh, Kelvin S-H
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc

Peh, Kelvin S-H (2011) Crop failure signals biodiversity crisis. Nature, 473 (7347), 284. (doi:10.1038/473284d). (PMID:21490659)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Crop failures have pushed up food prices globally (Nature 472, 169; 2011). Human well-being depends on biodiversity and natural habitats as a source of food. Ironically, the countries harbouring these vital natural assets are also those currently facing the most severe food crises.

A report from the investment bank Nomura (http://go.nature.com/pwrlc9) introduces a global index for measuring nations' food vulnerability. The most vulnerable depend totally on imported food, and citizens spend more than one-third of their salaries on it.

Of the 35 most vulnerable countries, 15 contain tropical biodiversity hotspots. To produce more food, these countries may lease out their biodiversity-rich land to farm cash crops. Liberia, for example, intends to add 220,000 hectares of oil-palm plantation (http://go.nature.com/xblcjz) to its existing 1.6 million hectares of agricultural land in the southeast, one of the last strongholds of tropical forest in western Africa.

Vulnerable nations need better cooperation among governments to address the structural causes of imbalances in the international agricultural system; more research into new technologies that incorporate the food-production requirements of the rural poor; and stronger protection of natural systems by linking biodiversity preservation to increased food security.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 19 May 2011
Organisations: Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 350934
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350934
ISSN: 0028-0836
PURE UUID: 3cfc8516-85c1-431b-bdd1-2105a23e9f16
ORCID for Kelvin S-H Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Apr 2013 16:05
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:36

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