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Computing shortest paths in 2D and 3D memristive networks

Computing shortest paths in 2D and 3D memristive networks
Computing shortest paths in 2D and 3D memristive networks
Global optimisation problems in networks often require shortest path length computations to determine the most efficient route. The simplest and most common problem with a shortest path solution is perhaps that of a traditional labyrinth or maze with a single entrance and exit. Many techniques and algorithms have been derived to solve mazes, which often tend to be computationally demanding, especially as the size of maze and number of paths increase. In addition, they are not suitable for performing multiple shortest path computations in mazes with multiple entrance and exit points. Mazes have been proposed to be solved using memristive networks and in this paper we extend the idea to show how networks of memristive elements can be utilised to solve multiple shortest paths in a single network. We also show simulations using memristive circuit elements that demonstrate shortest path computations in both 2D and 3D networks, which could have potential applications in various fields.
1-11
Ye, Zhanyou
fd2cf5b3-98cc-4930-947f-68baa7f3cfd0
Wu, Shi Hong Marcus
b016c89e-c023-46f6-b566-92a4305840c1
Prodromakis, Themistoklis
d58c9c10-9d25-4d22-b155-06c8437acfbf
Ye, Zhanyou
fd2cf5b3-98cc-4930-947f-68baa7f3cfd0
Wu, Shi Hong Marcus
b016c89e-c023-46f6-b566-92a4305840c1
Prodromakis, Themistoklis
d58c9c10-9d25-4d22-b155-06c8437acfbf

Ye, Zhanyou, Wu, Shi Hong Marcus and Prodromakis, Themistoklis (2013) Computing shortest paths in 2D and 3D memristive networks. Pre-print, (arXiv:1303.3927), 1-11.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Global optimisation problems in networks often require shortest path length computations to determine the most efficient route. The simplest and most common problem with a shortest path solution is perhaps that of a traditional labyrinth or maze with a single entrance and exit. Many techniques and algorithms have been derived to solve mazes, which often tend to be computationally demanding, especially as the size of maze and number of paths increase. In addition, they are not suitable for performing multiple shortest path computations in mazes with multiple entrance and exit points. Mazes have been proposed to be solved using memristive networks and in this paper we extend the idea to show how networks of memristive elements can be utilised to solve multiple shortest paths in a single network. We also show simulations using memristive circuit elements that demonstrate shortest path computations in both 2D and 3D networks, which could have potential applications in various fields.

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More information

Published date: 15 March 2013
Organisations: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 351543
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351543
PURE UUID: c9984588-07b3-4821-96a4-4defe661e673
ORCID for Themistoklis Prodromakis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6267-6909

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Apr 2013 11:13
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:24

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