The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part A — theoretical background to alternative approaches

Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part A — theoretical background to alternative approaches
Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part A — theoretical background to alternative approaches
Pressurised distensible tubes are subject to aneurysms. Aneurysm inception will take place at a location along the tube when a critical pressure, relative to tube wall thickness at that location, is reached. Parents will recognise the existence of critical pressure when endeavouring to inflate a party balloon. Another example of aneurysm is the thoracic aortic aneurysm corresponding to permanent dilation of the aorta in such proportions that it can be life threatening. Corrective procedures for aortic aneurysms involve the introduction of stiff materials to prevent aneurysm. Similarly in a proposed distensible tube based wave energy device aneurysm inception is partially controlled through the use of alternative longitudinal strips of inextensible material and appropriate rubber strips. Here we consider distensible tubes made of one material.

Having reviewed the aneurysm based literature some inconsistencies were observed between the material properties used in a non-linear finite element analysis and the material properties of the specimen used to provide experimental measurements for comparison. To appreciate the inconsis- tencies the authors decided to investigate aneurysm development using both non-linear finite element analyses and distinct alternative formulations and solution techniques. Rather than restrict strain- energy function to a subset of Neo-Hookean, Mooney–Rivlin and Ogden forms, the authors have implemented several alternative strain-energy models in parallel, also exploring for the first time the impact of using different combinations of uniaxial, equi-biaxial and pure shear experimental data for different rubbers.

This paper addresses the needs (necessary considerations, such as the Valanis–Landel hypothesis, Maxwell equal area rule and data selection criteria) for a realistic approach to modelling a distensible tube to provide predictions of critical pressure. In common with all other cited references a static analysis is used.
aneurysm, critical pressure, finite element analysis, semi-analytic analysis, strain-energy function
0020-7403
1-20
Bucchi, Andrea
9a30ab33-8b04-4bca-ab3a-4e42723f8215
Hearn, Grant E.
c1b2912b-fe5c-432c-aaa4-39c5eff75178
Bucchi, Andrea
9a30ab33-8b04-4bca-ab3a-4e42723f8215
Hearn, Grant E.
c1b2912b-fe5c-432c-aaa4-39c5eff75178

Bucchi, Andrea and Hearn, Grant E. (2013) Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part A — theoretical background to alternative approaches. International Journal of Mechanical Sciences, 71, 1-20. (doi:10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2013.02.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Pressurised distensible tubes are subject to aneurysms. Aneurysm inception will take place at a location along the tube when a critical pressure, relative to tube wall thickness at that location, is reached. Parents will recognise the existence of critical pressure when endeavouring to inflate a party balloon. Another example of aneurysm is the thoracic aortic aneurysm corresponding to permanent dilation of the aorta in such proportions that it can be life threatening. Corrective procedures for aortic aneurysms involve the introduction of stiff materials to prevent aneurysm. Similarly in a proposed distensible tube based wave energy device aneurysm inception is partially controlled through the use of alternative longitudinal strips of inextensible material and appropriate rubber strips. Here we consider distensible tubes made of one material.

Having reviewed the aneurysm based literature some inconsistencies were observed between the material properties used in a non-linear finite element analysis and the material properties of the specimen used to provide experimental measurements for comparison. To appreciate the inconsis- tencies the authors decided to investigate aneurysm development using both non-linear finite element analyses and distinct alternative formulations and solution techniques. Rather than restrict strain- energy function to a subset of Neo-Hookean, Mooney–Rivlin and Ogden forms, the authors have implemented several alternative strain-energy models in parallel, also exploring for the first time the impact of using different combinations of uniaxial, equi-biaxial and pure shear experimental data for different rubbers.

This paper addresses the needs (necessary considerations, such as the Valanis–Landel hypothesis, Maxwell equal area rule and data selection criteria) for a realistic approach to modelling a distensible tube to provide predictions of critical pressure. In common with all other cited references a static analysis is used.

PDF
__soton.ac.uk_ude_personalfiles_users_asv1a09_mydesktop_GEH Eprints_MS_2417_last_version.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 24 February 2013
Published date: June 2013
Keywords: aneurysm, critical pressure, finite element analysis, semi-analytic analysis, strain-energy function
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 351795
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351795
ISSN: 0020-7403
PURE UUID: 158ec026-4ef8-42e3-8e6f-248e625ca4a6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Apr 2013 13:23
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:23

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×