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Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part B — application and comparison of alternative approaches

Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part B — application and comparison of alternative approaches
Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part B — application and comparison of alternative approaches
The theoretical treatise of the companion paper produced three distinct approaches of increasing complexity. Just as the presented theory is equally applicable to other medical, scientific or engineering applications, so the systematic numerical investigation now reported is relevant to these fields of study. An independently developed finite element analysis (FEA) solution is used to show that the commercial package selected provides critical pressure predictions of a consistent order of magnitude. The FEA sensitivity analysis considers five distinct elements with up to seven alternative strain-energy functions and different combinations of uniaxial, equi-biaxial and pure shear data sets to identify the effect on critical pressure prediction and overall behaviour of a pressurised distensible tube. This represents the most comprehensive comparative study available in the open literature. For a selected strain-energy function the impact of the variation of length to initial radius and wall thickness to initial radius are investigated. Thereafter it is demonstrated that these two ratios rather than actual dimensions are the driving factors behind pressurised tube behaviour.
0020-7403
155-170
Bucchi, Andrea
9a30ab33-8b04-4bca-ab3a-4e42723f8215
Hearn, G.E.
c1b2912b-fe5c-432c-aaa4-39c5eff75178
Bucchi, Andrea
9a30ab33-8b04-4bca-ab3a-4e42723f8215
Hearn, G.E.
c1b2912b-fe5c-432c-aaa4-39c5eff75178

Bucchi, Andrea and Hearn, G.E. (2013) Predictions of aneurysm formation in distensible tubes: Part B — application and comparison of alternative approaches. International Journal of Mechanical Sciences, 70, 155-170. (doi:10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2013.02.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The theoretical treatise of the companion paper produced three distinct approaches of increasing complexity. Just as the presented theory is equally applicable to other medical, scientific or engineering applications, so the systematic numerical investigation now reported is relevant to these fields of study. An independently developed finite element analysis (FEA) solution is used to show that the commercial package selected provides critical pressure predictions of a consistent order of magnitude. The FEA sensitivity analysis considers five distinct elements with up to seven alternative strain-energy functions and different combinations of uniaxial, equi-biaxial and pure shear data sets to identify the effect on critical pressure prediction and overall behaviour of a pressurised distensible tube. This represents the most comprehensive comparative study available in the open literature. For a selected strain-energy function the impact of the variation of length to initial radius and wall thickness to initial radius are investigated. Thereafter it is demonstrated that these two ratios rather than actual dimensions are the driving factors behind pressurised tube behaviour.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 9 May 2013
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

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Local EPrints ID: 351803
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351803
ISSN: 0020-7403
PURE UUID: 6c51c766-d85f-4121-9652-ba1a6990a8cd

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Date deposited: 29 Apr 2013 13:37
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 08:30

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Contributors

Author: Andrea Bucchi
Author: G.E. Hearn

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