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A novel videography method for generating crack-extension resistance curves in small bone samples

A novel videography method for generating crack-extension resistance curves in small bone samples
A novel videography method for generating crack-extension resistance curves in small bone samples
Assessment of bone quality is an emerging solution for quantifying the effects of bone pathology or treatment. Perhaps one of the most important parameters characterising bone quality is the toughness behaviour of bone. Particularly, fracture toughness, is becoming a popular means for evaluating bone quality. The method is moving from a single value approach that models bone as a linear-elastic material (using the stress intensity factor, K) towards full crack extension resistance curves (R-curves) using a non-linear model (the strain energy release rate in J-R curves). However, for explanted human bone or small animal bones, there are difficulties in measuring crack-extension resistance curves due to size constraints at the millimetre and sub-millimetre scale. This research proposes a novel "whitening front tracking" method that uses videography to generate full fracture resistance curves in small bone samples where crack propagation cannot typically be observed. Here we present this method on sharp edge notched samples (<1 mm×1 mm×Length) prepared from four human femora tested in three-point bending. Each sample was loaded in a mechanical tester with the crack propagation recorded using videography and analysed using an algorithm to track the whitening (damage) zone. Using the "whitening front tracking" method, full R-curves and J-R curves could be generated for these samples. The curves for this antiplane longitudinal orientation were similar to those found in the literature, being between the published longitudinal and transverse orientations. The proposed technique shows the ability to generate full "crack" extension resistance curves by tracking the whitening front propagation to overcome the small size limitations and the single value approach.
1932-6203
e55641
Katsamenis, Orestis L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Jenkins, Thomas
e8110e1f-0b08-41ac-932a-46647c6845f3
Quinci, Federico
f8106f90-d2fe-4539-8d75-0af0d6d441ca
Michopoulou, Sofia
888207f0-a8b6-4ecb-ae0c-ad03d2128a2d
Sinclair, Ian
6005f6c1-f478-434e-a52d-d310c18ade0d
Thurner, Philipp J.
ab711ddd-784e-48de-aaad-f56aec40f84f
Katsamenis, Orestis L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Jenkins, Thomas
e8110e1f-0b08-41ac-932a-46647c6845f3
Quinci, Federico
f8106f90-d2fe-4539-8d75-0af0d6d441ca
Michopoulou, Sofia
888207f0-a8b6-4ecb-ae0c-ad03d2128a2d
Sinclair, Ian
6005f6c1-f478-434e-a52d-d310c18ade0d
Thurner, Philipp J.
ab711ddd-784e-48de-aaad-f56aec40f84f

Katsamenis, Orestis L., Jenkins, Thomas, Quinci, Federico, Michopoulou, Sofia, Sinclair, Ian and Thurner, Philipp J. (2013) A novel videography method for generating crack-extension resistance curves in small bone samples. PLoS ONE, 8 (2), e55641. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0055641). (PMID:23405186)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Assessment of bone quality is an emerging solution for quantifying the effects of bone pathology or treatment. Perhaps one of the most important parameters characterising bone quality is the toughness behaviour of bone. Particularly, fracture toughness, is becoming a popular means for evaluating bone quality. The method is moving from a single value approach that models bone as a linear-elastic material (using the stress intensity factor, K) towards full crack extension resistance curves (R-curves) using a non-linear model (the strain energy release rate in J-R curves). However, for explanted human bone or small animal bones, there are difficulties in measuring crack-extension resistance curves due to size constraints at the millimetre and sub-millimetre scale. This research proposes a novel "whitening front tracking" method that uses videography to generate full fracture resistance curves in small bone samples where crack propagation cannot typically be observed. Here we present this method on sharp edge notched samples (<1 mm×1 mm×Length) prepared from four human femora tested in three-point bending. Each sample was loaded in a mechanical tester with the crack propagation recorded using videography and analysed using an algorithm to track the whitening (damage) zone. Using the "whitening front tracking" method, full R-curves and J-R curves could be generated for these samples. The curves for this antiplane longitudinal orientation were similar to those found in the literature, being between the published longitudinal and transverse orientations. The proposed technique shows the ability to generate full "crack" extension resistance curves by tracking the whitening front propagation to overcome the small size limitations and the single value approach.

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Published date: 6 February 2013
Organisations: Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp, Bioengineering Group, Engineering Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Education Hub

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 351861
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351861
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 2f3461d1-6ec4-4426-b88e-e13d100f0a13
ORCID for Orestis L. Katsamenis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4367-4147
ORCID for Philipp J. Thurner: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7588-9041

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Date deposited: 29 Apr 2013 14:10
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:16

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Contributors

Author: Thomas Jenkins
Author: Federico Quinci
Author: Sofia Michopoulou
Author: Ian Sinclair

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