The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Size at birth, morning cortisol and cardiometabolic risk markers in healthy Indian children

Size at birth, morning cortisol and cardiometabolic risk markers in healthy Indian children
Size at birth, morning cortisol and cardiometabolic risk markers in healthy Indian children
OBJECTIVE: Prenatal programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may link reduced fetal growth with higher adult chronic disease risk. South Asians have a high prevalence of low birth weight and a thin-fat phenotype which is associated with subsequent type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Altered HPA activity could be one of the pathological processes underlying this link. METHODS: Plasma morning cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) concentrations were determined in 528 children aged 9.5 years from a prospective birth cohort in India. They had detailed anthropometry at birth, and current measurements of anthropometry, plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations and blood pressure. Insulin resistance (Homeostasis Model Assessment) and insulin secretion (the 30-minute insulin increment) were also assessed. RESULTS: None of the birth measurements were associated with cortisol concentrations, but both birth weight (P=0.03) and length (P=0.004) were inversely associated with CBG concentrations. Cortisol concentrations were inversely associated with current body mass index (P=0.02), and positively associated with glucose (fasting: P<0.001; 30-minute: P=0.002) concentrations, and systolic blood pressure (P=0.005) but not insulin resistance or the insulin increment. CONCLUSION: Higher morning cortisol is associated with higher cardiometabolic risk markers in Indian children. Although cortisol concentrations did not appear to be related to birth size, small size at birth was associated with higher CBG levels, and may be one of the processes by which fetal undernutrition affects adult health. The findings suggest a need for dynamic testing of HPA axis activity (such as measuring stress responses). © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Krishnaveni, G. V.
eb73f522-17b0-4aa9-a7c7-df0014ced8c3
Veena, S. R.
314c8753-3131-4e9a-9701-680bfdff6aee
Dhube, A.
a406dd84-19de-4600-b632-8ff03d68c1f6
Karat, S. C.
6d394c4d-6f7a-43eb-b53b-e03b6be85a0c
Phillips, D. I. W.
29b73be7-2ff9-4fff-ae42-d59842df4cc6
Fall, C. H. D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Krishnaveni, G. V.
eb73f522-17b0-4aa9-a7c7-df0014ced8c3
Veena, S. R.
314c8753-3131-4e9a-9701-680bfdff6aee
Dhube, A.
a406dd84-19de-4600-b632-8ff03d68c1f6
Karat, S. C.
6d394c4d-6f7a-43eb-b53b-e03b6be85a0c
Phillips, D. I. W.
29b73be7-2ff9-4fff-ae42-d59842df4cc6
Fall, C. H. D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18

Krishnaveni, G. V., Veena, S. R., Dhube, A., Karat, S. C., Phillips, D. I. W. and Fall, C. H. D. (2013) Size at birth, morning cortisol and cardiometabolic risk markers in healthy Indian children. Clinical Endocrinology. (doi:10.1111/cen.12143). (PMID:23297873)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Prenatal programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may link reduced fetal growth with higher adult chronic disease risk. South Asians have a high prevalence of low birth weight and a thin-fat phenotype which is associated with subsequent type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Altered HPA activity could be one of the pathological processes underlying this link. METHODS: Plasma morning cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) concentrations were determined in 528 children aged 9.5 years from a prospective birth cohort in India. They had detailed anthropometry at birth, and current measurements of anthropometry, plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations and blood pressure. Insulin resistance (Homeostasis Model Assessment) and insulin secretion (the 30-minute insulin increment) were also assessed. RESULTS: None of the birth measurements were associated with cortisol concentrations, but both birth weight (P=0.03) and length (P=0.004) were inversely associated with CBG concentrations. Cortisol concentrations were inversely associated with current body mass index (P=0.02), and positively associated with glucose (fasting: P<0.001; 30-minute: P=0.002) concentrations, and systolic blood pressure (P=0.005) but not insulin resistance or the insulin increment. CONCLUSION: Higher morning cortisol is associated with higher cardiometabolic risk markers in Indian children. Although cortisol concentrations did not appear to be related to birth size, small size at birth was associated with higher CBG levels, and may be one of the processes by which fetal undernutrition affects adult health. The findings suggest a need for dynamic testing of HPA axis activity (such as measuring stress responses). © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 8 January 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 351873
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351873
PURE UUID: bbb2c0f7-3896-490e-9ee9-1cade271dd92
ORCID for C. H. D. Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Apr 2013 15:13
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: G. V. Krishnaveni
Author: S. R. Veena
Author: A. Dhube
Author: S. C. Karat
Author: D. I. W. Phillips
Author: C. H. D. Fall ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×