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Breast feeding duration, age at starting periods and high BMI risk and adiposity in Indian children

Breast feeding duration, age at starting periods and high BMI risk and adiposity in Indian children
Breast feeding duration, age at starting periods and high BMI risk and adiposity in Indian children
This study utilized data from a prospective birth cohort study on 568 Indian children, to determine whether a longer duration of breastfeeding and later introduction of solid feeding were associated with a reduced higher body mass index (BMI) and less adiposity. Main outcomes were high BMI (>90th within-cohort sex-specific BMI percentile) and sum of skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular) at age 5. Main exposures were breastfeeding (six categories from 1–4 to ?21 months) and age of starting regular solid feeding (four categories from ?3 to ?6 months). Data on infant-feeding practices, socio-economic and maternal factors were collected by questionnaire. Birthweight, maternal and child anthropometry were measured. Multiple regression analysis that accounted for potential confounders demonstrated a small magnitude of effect for breastfeeding duration or introduction of solid feeds on the risk of high BMI but not for lower skinfold thickness. Breastfeeding duration was strongly negatively associated with weight gain (0–2 years) [adjusted ? = –0.12 standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.19 to –0.05 per category change in breastfeeding duration, P = 0.001], and weight gain (0–2 years) was strongly associated with high BMI at 5 years (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.53–5.56, P < 0.001). In our sample, findings suggest that longer breastfeeding duration and later introduction of solids has a small reduction on later high BMI risk and a negligible effect on skinfold thickness. However, accounting for sampling variability, these findings cannot exclude the possibility of no effect at the population level.
breastfeeding duration, complementary feeds, childhood body mass index, adiposity, infant weight gain, india
1740-8695
199-216
Caleyachetty, A.
6aa95751-5ac2-4686-9b0f-f5eadc73fd7e
Krishnaveni, G.V.
e9cc468a-8262-4dde-8eba-e047c68a3dce
Veena, S.R.
2acd1a9f-ce06-4cd2-bbdb-8f0057308e0e
Hill, J.
fa0510a6-d43e-42eb-a3d0-e63173004fd8
Karat, S.C.
ed9c5413-3fa2-4d00-b283-d1936a907df4
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Wills, A.K.
a49cf0bc-8fe1-4672-8ff2-da46760d2059
Caleyachetty, A.
6aa95751-5ac2-4686-9b0f-f5eadc73fd7e
Krishnaveni, G.V.
e9cc468a-8262-4dde-8eba-e047c68a3dce
Veena, S.R.
2acd1a9f-ce06-4cd2-bbdb-8f0057308e0e
Hill, J.
fa0510a6-d43e-42eb-a3d0-e63173004fd8
Karat, S.C.
ed9c5413-3fa2-4d00-b283-d1936a907df4
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Wills, A.K.
a49cf0bc-8fe1-4672-8ff2-da46760d2059

Caleyachetty, A., Krishnaveni, G.V., Veena, S.R., Hill, J., Karat, S.C., Fall, C.H. and Wills, A.K. (2013) Breast feeding duration, age at starting periods and high BMI risk and adiposity in Indian children. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 9 (2), 199-216. (doi:10.1111/j.1740-8709.2011.00341.x). (PMID:21978208)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study utilized data from a prospective birth cohort study on 568 Indian children, to determine whether a longer duration of breastfeeding and later introduction of solid feeding were associated with a reduced higher body mass index (BMI) and less adiposity. Main outcomes were high BMI (>90th within-cohort sex-specific BMI percentile) and sum of skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular) at age 5. Main exposures were breastfeeding (six categories from 1–4 to ?21 months) and age of starting regular solid feeding (four categories from ?3 to ?6 months). Data on infant-feeding practices, socio-economic and maternal factors were collected by questionnaire. Birthweight, maternal and child anthropometry were measured. Multiple regression analysis that accounted for potential confounders demonstrated a small magnitude of effect for breastfeeding duration or introduction of solid feeds on the risk of high BMI but not for lower skinfold thickness. Breastfeeding duration was strongly negatively associated with weight gain (0–2 years) [adjusted ? = –0.12 standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.19 to –0.05 per category change in breastfeeding duration, P = 0.001], and weight gain (0–2 years) was strongly associated with high BMI at 5 years (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.53–5.56, P < 0.001). In our sample, findings suggest that longer breastfeeding duration and later introduction of solids has a small reduction on later high BMI risk and a negligible effect on skinfold thickness. However, accounting for sampling variability, these findings cannot exclude the possibility of no effect at the population level.

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Published date: April 2013
Keywords: breastfeeding duration, complementary feeds, childhood body mass index, adiposity, infant weight gain, india
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 351920
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351920
ISSN: 1740-8695
PURE UUID: 95c3db92-3833-479f-a974-7f30b72de9bd

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Date deposited: 13 May 2013 10:20
Last modified: 25 Oct 2017 16:31

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Contributors

Author: A. Caleyachetty
Author: G.V. Krishnaveni
Author: S.R. Veena
Author: J. Hill
Author: S.C. Karat
Author: C.H. Fall
Author: A.K. Wills

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