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The reach and impact of Child Support Grants: evidence from KwaZulu-Natal

The reach and impact of Child Support Grants: evidence from KwaZulu-Natal
The reach and impact of Child Support Grants: evidence from KwaZulu-Natal
This paper examines the reach and impact of the South African Child Support Grant, using longitudinal data collected through the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies. The grant is being taken up for a third of all age-eligible resident children, and appears to be reaching those children living in the poorer households of the demographic surveillance area (DSA). Children who received the grant are significantly more likely to be enrolled in school in the years following grant receipt than are equally poor children of the same age. However, older brothers and sisters of grant recipients, when they were observed at younger ages, were less likely than other children to be enrolled in school – perhaps reflecting the greater poverty in grant-receiving households. Thus the grant appears to help overcome the impact of poverty on school enrolment.
0376-835X
467-482
Case, A.
6ec1aee5-3943-4a72-9463-4ef5d143ad9a
Hosegood, Victoria
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Lund, F.
9b87e435-5830-4457-9e7c-ab2cd2ec605a
Case, A.
6ec1aee5-3943-4a72-9463-4ef5d143ad9a
Hosegood, Victoria
c59a89d5-5edc-42dd-b282-f44458fd2993
Lund, F.
9b87e435-5830-4457-9e7c-ab2cd2ec605a

Case, A., Hosegood, Victoria and Lund, F. (2005) The reach and impact of Child Support Grants: evidence from KwaZulu-Natal. Development Southern Africa, 22 (4), 467-482. (doi:10.1080/03768350500322925).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines the reach and impact of the South African Child Support Grant, using longitudinal data collected through the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies. The grant is being taken up for a third of all age-eligible resident children, and appears to be reaching those children living in the poorer households of the demographic surveillance area (DSA). Children who received the grant are significantly more likely to be enrolled in school in the years following grant receipt than are equally poor children of the same age. However, older brothers and sisters of grant recipients, when they were observed at younger ages, were less likely than other children to be enrolled in school – perhaps reflecting the greater poverty in grant-receiving households. Thus the grant appears to help overcome the impact of poverty on school enrolment.

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Published date: 2005
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 351960
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351960
ISSN: 0376-835X
PURE UUID: 14490b7c-f5fd-46a7-9a3d-18d317ffd6b3
ORCID for Victoria Hosegood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2244-2518

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Date deposited: 14 May 2013 11:49
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:32

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