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The use of culture-independent tools to characterize bacteria in endo-tracheal aspirates from pre-term infants at risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia

The use of culture-independent tools to characterize bacteria in endo-tracheal aspirates from pre-term infants at risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia
The use of culture-independent tools to characterize bacteria in endo-tracheal aspirates from pre-term infants at risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia
Although premature infants are increasingly surviving the neonatal period, up to one-third develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Despite evidence that bacterial colonization of the neonatal respiratory tract by certain bacteria may be a risk factor in BPD development, little is known about the role these bacteria play. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of culture-independent molecular profiling methodologies to identify potential etiological agents in neonatal airway secretions. This study used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone sequence analyses to characterize bacterial species in endo-tracheal (ET) aspirates from eight intubated pre-term infants. A wide range of different bacteria was identified in the samples. Forty-seven T-RF band lengths were resolved in the sample set, with a range of 0-15 separate species in each patient. Clone sequence analyses confirmed the identity of individual species detected by T-RFLP. We speculate that the identification of known opportunistic pathogens including S. aureus, Enterobacter sp., Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus sp., within the airways of pre-term infants, might be causally related to the subsequent development of BPD. Further, we suggest that culture-independent techniques, such as T-RFLP, hold important potential for the characterization of neonatal conditions, such as BPD.
0300-5577
333-337
Stressmann, F.A.
4dda568f-07a0-44ae-9f49-96818c8db3ba
Connett, G.J.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Goss, K.
f82566ce-434a-410e-a70c-da478eeb9620
Kollamparambil, T.G.
ce60a5d5-6136-4df3-a896-9511765c6315
Patel, N.
1cd9d48d-dc57-445a-bb7d-e70edd515932
Payne, M.S.
8685e989-4f66-4e06-9c73-69a42fbd89c4
Puddy, V.
c2404a6e-2775-4185-bbbd-93a3d191b21a
Legg, J.
d794b6a3-768c-4986-b67f-bf9a30fe228e
Bruce, K.D.
1ded890b-addf-45bd-ba59-dbaedaeee931
Rogers, G.B.
9a939cbd-f83a-41ce-8ba4-a71065e0b87e
Stressmann, F.A.
4dda568f-07a0-44ae-9f49-96818c8db3ba
Connett, G.J.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Goss, K.
f82566ce-434a-410e-a70c-da478eeb9620
Kollamparambil, T.G.
ce60a5d5-6136-4df3-a896-9511765c6315
Patel, N.
1cd9d48d-dc57-445a-bb7d-e70edd515932
Payne, M.S.
8685e989-4f66-4e06-9c73-69a42fbd89c4
Puddy, V.
c2404a6e-2775-4185-bbbd-93a3d191b21a
Legg, J.
d794b6a3-768c-4986-b67f-bf9a30fe228e
Bruce, K.D.
1ded890b-addf-45bd-ba59-dbaedaeee931
Rogers, G.B.
9a939cbd-f83a-41ce-8ba4-a71065e0b87e

Stressmann, F.A., Connett, G.J., Goss, K., Kollamparambil, T.G., Patel, N., Payne, M.S., Puddy, V., Legg, J., Bruce, K.D. and Rogers, G.B. (2010) The use of culture-independent tools to characterize bacteria in endo-tracheal aspirates from pre-term infants at risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 38 (3), 333-337. (doi:10.1515/JPM.2010.026). (PMID:20121490)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although premature infants are increasingly surviving the neonatal period, up to one-third develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Despite evidence that bacterial colonization of the neonatal respiratory tract by certain bacteria may be a risk factor in BPD development, little is known about the role these bacteria play. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of culture-independent molecular profiling methodologies to identify potential etiological agents in neonatal airway secretions. This study used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone sequence analyses to characterize bacterial species in endo-tracheal (ET) aspirates from eight intubated pre-term infants. A wide range of different bacteria was identified in the samples. Forty-seven T-RF band lengths were resolved in the sample set, with a range of 0-15 separate species in each patient. Clone sequence analyses confirmed the identity of individual species detected by T-RFLP. We speculate that the identification of known opportunistic pathogens including S. aureus, Enterobacter sp., Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus sp., within the airways of pre-term infants, might be causally related to the subsequent development of BPD. Further, we suggest that culture-independent techniques, such as T-RFLP, hold important potential for the characterization of neonatal conditions, such as BPD.

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Published date: 2 February 2010
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 352166
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352166
ISSN: 0300-5577
PURE UUID: ee296968-44cf-412f-8e1b-3bbcbb3197eb
ORCID for G.J. Connett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1310-3239

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Date deposited: 07 May 2013 12:56
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:23

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Contributors

Author: F.A. Stressmann
Author: G.J. Connett ORCID iD
Author: K. Goss
Author: T.G. Kollamparambil
Author: N. Patel
Author: M.S. Payne
Author: V. Puddy
Author: J. Legg
Author: K.D. Bruce
Author: G.B. Rogers

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