The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Do smaller homes result in increased integration?

Do smaller homes result in increased integration?
Do smaller homes result in increased integration?
One of the best publicised consequences of the policy of community care is the resettlement of people with a mental handicap from large institutions into homes in the community. Normalisation dictates that smaller residences have greater potential for integration than larger ones. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in the number of community contacts made by residents with a mental handicap living in small and large community units. Community contacts of 40 individuals with a mental handicap were recorded by care staff for a period of four weeks. Twenty one of the subjects lived in three flats, with seven, ten and eight beds respectively and the remaining 19 lived in a large unit with 24 beds. Results show that people residing in the smaller units experienced significantly more community contacts than those in the large unit (p < 0.05). Areas for further study are identified.
0952-9608
303-311
Ballinger, Claire
1495742c-90aa-4074-920e-95e6cc3d5380
Ballinger, Claire
1495742c-90aa-4074-920e-95e6cc3d5380

Ballinger, Claire (1993) Do smaller homes result in increased integration? Mental Handicap Research, 6 (4), 303-311. (doi:10.1111/j.1468-3148.1993.tb00061.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

One of the best publicised consequences of the policy of community care is the resettlement of people with a mental handicap from large institutions into homes in the community. Normalisation dictates that smaller residences have greater potential for integration than larger ones. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in the number of community contacts made by residents with a mental handicap living in small and large community units. Community contacts of 40 individuals with a mental handicap were recorded by care staff for a period of four weeks. Twenty one of the subjects lived in three flats, with seven, ten and eight beds respectively and the remaining 19 lived in a large unit with 24 beds. Results show that people residing in the smaller units experienced significantly more community contacts than those in the large unit (p < 0.05). Areas for further study are identified.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: December 1993
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352280
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352280
ISSN: 0952-9608
PURE UUID: ab75dbde-5720-41ba-bc52-1564eb8e627e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 May 2013 12:43
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:16

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×