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Nano-magnetic materials: spin crossover compounds vs. single molecule magnets vs. single chain magnets

Nano-magnetic materials: spin crossover compounds vs. single molecule magnets vs. single chain magnets
Nano-magnetic materials: spin crossover compounds vs. single molecule magnets vs. single chain magnets
Brief introductions to spin crossover (SCO), single molecule magnetism (SMM) and single chain magnetism (SCM) are provided. Each section is illustrated by selected examples that have contributed significantly to the development of these fields, including recent efforts to produce materials (films, attachment to surfaces etc.). The advantages and disadvantages of each class of magnetically interesting compound are considered, along with the key challenges that remain to be overcome before such compounds can be used commercially as nanocomponents. This invited perspective article is intended to be easily comprehensible to non-specialists in the field.
0300-9246
7331-7340
Brooker, Sally
2ee9681a-3ff7-41be-88c5-681f66b953ef
Kitchen, Jonathan A.
3999f5cb-d53e-4c51-b750-627bd2a1b9b6
Brooker, Sally
2ee9681a-3ff7-41be-88c5-681f66b953ef
Kitchen, Jonathan A.
3999f5cb-d53e-4c51-b750-627bd2a1b9b6

Brooker, Sally and Kitchen, Jonathan A. (2009) Nano-magnetic materials: spin crossover compounds vs. single molecule magnets vs. single chain magnets. Dalton Transactions, 2009 (36), 7331-7340. (doi:10.1039/b907682d).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Brief introductions to spin crossover (SCO), single molecule magnetism (SMM) and single chain magnetism (SCM) are provided. Each section is illustrated by selected examples that have contributed significantly to the development of these fields, including recent efforts to produce materials (films, attachment to surfaces etc.). The advantages and disadvantages of each class of magnetically interesting compound are considered, along with the key challenges that remain to be overcome before such compounds can be used commercially as nanocomponents. This invited perspective article is intended to be easily comprehensible to non-specialists in the field.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 27 July 2009
Organisations: Organic Chemistry: Synthesis, Catalysis and Flow, Chemistry, Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352497
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352497
ISSN: 0300-9246
PURE UUID: a9eeaed0-beca-4983-8288-953e2fd1e391
ORCID for Jonathan A. Kitchen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7139-5666

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2013 14:21
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:33

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