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Trajectories from youth to adulthood: choice and structure for young people before and during recession

Trajectories from youth to adulthood: choice and structure for young people before and during recession
Trajectories from youth to adulthood: choice and structure for young people before and during recession
This chapter is concerned with what the economic recession and rising youth unemployment in the UK might mean for young people’s trajectories into adulthood and work transition. It is based on a qualitative longitudinal study that has been tracking young people’s lateral relationships over the past four years or more. A series of case studies of young people’s biographical negotiations are used, drawing on Brannen and colleagues’ four-fold transitions typology which highlights the structural forces underpinning the choices young people are able to make. The chapter argues that young people enter a period of economic recession with prior resources and particular trajectories already in play in their lives. Thus, for the young people in this study, rather than recession bringing about a changed or fractured pathway into adulthood, it is providing a certain set of conditions for embedding particular, pre-existing trajectories.
1872767583
82-94
Tufnell Press
Edwards, Rosalind
e43912c0-f149-4457-81a9-9c4e00a4bb42
Weller, Susie
6ad1e079-1a7c-41bf-8678-bff11c55142b
Helve, Helen
Evans, Karen
Edwards, Rosalind
e43912c0-f149-4457-81a9-9c4e00a4bb42
Weller, Susie
6ad1e079-1a7c-41bf-8678-bff11c55142b
Helve, Helen
Evans, Karen

Edwards, Rosalind and Weller, Susie (2013) Trajectories from youth to adulthood: choice and structure for young people before and during recession. In, Helve, Helen and Evans, Karen (eds.) Youth and Work Transitions in Changing Social Landscapes. London, GB. Tufnell Press, pp. 82-94.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with what the economic recession and rising youth unemployment in the UK might mean for young people’s trajectories into adulthood and work transition. It is based on a qualitative longitudinal study that has been tracking young people’s lateral relationships over the past four years or more. A series of case studies of young people’s biographical negotiations are used, drawing on Brannen and colleagues’ four-fold transitions typology which highlights the structural forces underpinning the choices young people are able to make. The chapter argues that young people enter a period of economic recession with prior resources and particular trajectories already in play in their lives. Thus, for the young people in this study, rather than recession bringing about a changed or fractured pathway into adulthood, it is providing a certain set of conditions for embedding particular, pre-existing trajectories.

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More information

Published date: May 2013
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352511
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352511
ISBN: 1872767583
PURE UUID: 69c97c42-0a78-4e56-9a6b-aa9e73722b24
ORCID for Rosalind Edwards: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3512-9029
ORCID for Susie Weller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6839-876X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 May 2013 10:05
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 03:33

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Contributors

Author: Susie Weller ORCID iD
Editor: Helen Helve
Editor: Karen Evans

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