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Maternal lipids are as important as glucose for fetal growth; findings from the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study

Maternal lipids are as important as glucose for fetal growth; findings from the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study
Maternal lipids are as important as glucose for fetal growth; findings from the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study
OBJECTIVE To study the relationship between maternal circulating fuels and neonatal size and compare the relative effects of glucose and lipids.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Pune Maternal Nutrition Study (1993–1996) investigated the influence of maternal nutrition on fetal growth. We measured maternal body size and glucose and lipid concentrations during pregnancy and examined their relationship with birth size in full-term babies using correlation and regression techniques.

RESULTS The mothers (n = 631) were young (mean age 21 years), short (mean height 151.9 cm), and thin (BMI 18.0 kg/m2) but were relatively more adipose (body fat 21.1%). Their diet was mostly vegetarian. Between 18 and 28 weeks’ gestation, fasting glucose concentrations remained stable, whereas total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations increased and HDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased. The mean birth weight of the offspring was 2666 g. Total cholesterol and triglycerides at both 18 and 28 weeks and plasma glucose only at 28 weeks were associated directly with birth size. One SD higher maternal fasting glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations at 28 weeks were associated with 37, 54, and 36 g higher birth weights, respectively (P < 0.05 for all). HDL-cholesterol concentrations were unrelated to newborn measurements. The results were similar if preterm deliveries also were included in the analysis (total n = 700).

CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest an influence of maternal lipids on neonatal size in addition to the well-established effect of glucose. Further research should be directed at defining the clinical relevance of these findings.
1935-5548
2706-2713
Kulkarni, S.R.
1aa36e94-aa32-4b2e-9753-0b3b99cda316
Kumaran, K.
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Rao, S.R.
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Chougule, S.
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Deokar, T.
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Bhalerao, A.
6bf1f77e-190c-4952-a175-55ccb7e26c58
Solatt, V.
830a034e-60e7-48aa-8aeb-c4f1fac41d73
Fall, C.H.D
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Bhat, D.S.
75412cda-4b68-4286-82e2-8f9ea39fd842
Yajnik, C.S.
ea0648f2-b384-4e5c-9e0f-45cc852e0c75
Kulkarni, S.R.
1aa36e94-aa32-4b2e-9753-0b3b99cda316
Kumaran, K.
de6f872c-7339-4a52-be84-e3bbae707744
Rao, S.R.
f3e28584-0b28-4b06-a082-0bdbdf357f2a
Chougule, S.
669acbd6-1793-4543-8fda-27043fcc6f7a
Deokar, T.
216a00c9-c66b-43c5-8ad1-4e66439d1d6c
Bhalerao, A.
6bf1f77e-190c-4952-a175-55ccb7e26c58
Solatt, V.
830a034e-60e7-48aa-8aeb-c4f1fac41d73
Fall, C.H.D
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Bhat, D.S.
75412cda-4b68-4286-82e2-8f9ea39fd842
Yajnik, C.S.
ea0648f2-b384-4e5c-9e0f-45cc852e0c75

Kulkarni, S.R., Kumaran, K., Rao, S.R., Chougule, S., Deokar, T., Bhalerao, A., Solatt, V., Fall, C.H.D, Bhat, D.S. and Yajnik, C.S. (2013) Maternal lipids are as important as glucose for fetal growth; findings from the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study. Diabetes Care, 36 (9), 2706-2713. (doi:10.2337/dc12-2445). (PMID:23757425)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To study the relationship between maternal circulating fuels and neonatal size and compare the relative effects of glucose and lipids.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Pune Maternal Nutrition Study (1993–1996) investigated the influence of maternal nutrition on fetal growth. We measured maternal body size and glucose and lipid concentrations during pregnancy and examined their relationship with birth size in full-term babies using correlation and regression techniques.

RESULTS The mothers (n = 631) were young (mean age 21 years), short (mean height 151.9 cm), and thin (BMI 18.0 kg/m2) but were relatively more adipose (body fat 21.1%). Their diet was mostly vegetarian. Between 18 and 28 weeks’ gestation, fasting glucose concentrations remained stable, whereas total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations increased and HDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased. The mean birth weight of the offspring was 2666 g. Total cholesterol and triglycerides at both 18 and 28 weeks and plasma glucose only at 28 weeks were associated directly with birth size. One SD higher maternal fasting glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations at 28 weeks were associated with 37, 54, and 36 g higher birth weights, respectively (P < 0.05 for all). HDL-cholesterol concentrations were unrelated to newborn measurements. The results were similar if preterm deliveries also were included in the analysis (total n = 700).

CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest an influence of maternal lipids on neonatal size in addition to the well-established effect of glucose. Further research should be directed at defining the clinical relevance of these findings.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 11 June 2013
Published date: September 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 352569
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352569
ISSN: 1935-5548
PURE UUID: abe9b57f-d9a1-448b-b23f-6df0bdd555db
ORCID for C.H.D Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

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Date deposited: 16 May 2013 10:41
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:37

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Contributors

Author: S.R. Kulkarni
Author: K. Kumaran
Author: S.R. Rao
Author: S. Chougule
Author: T. Deokar
Author: A. Bhalerao
Author: V. Solatt
Author: C.H.D Fall ORCID iD
Author: D.S. Bhat
Author: C.S. Yajnik

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