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Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England

Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England
Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England
The ingress of particulate material into freshwater spawning substrates is thought to be contributing to the declining success of salmonids reported over recent years for many rivers. Accordingly, the need for reliable information on the key sources of the sediment problem has progressed up the management agenda. Whilst previous work has focussed on apportioning the sources of minerogenic fine sediment degrading spawning habitats, there remains a need to develop procedures for generating corresponding information for the potentially harmful sediment-bound organic matter that represents an overlooked component of interstitial sediment. A source tracing procedure based on composite signatures combining bulk stable 13C and 15N isotope values with organic molecular structures detected using near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was therefore used to assess the primary sources of sediment-bound organic matter sampled from artificial spawning redds. Composite signatures were selected using a combination of the Kruskal–Wallis H-test, principal component analysis and GA-driven discriminant function analysis. Interstitial sediment samples were collected using time-integrating basket traps which were inserted at the start of the salmonid spawning season and extracted in conjunction with critical phases of fish development (eyeing, hatch, emergence, late spawning). Over the duration of these four basket extractions, the overall relative frequency-weighted average median (± 95% confidence limits) source contributions to the interstitial sediment-bound organic matter were estimated to be in the order: instream decaying vegetation (39 ± < 1%; full range 0–77%); damaged road verges (28 ± < 1%; full range 0–77%); septic tanks (22 ± < 1%; full range 0–50%), and; farm yard manures/slurries (11 ± < 1%; full range 0–61%). The reported procedure provides a promising basis for understanding the key sources of interstitial sediment-bound organic matter and can be applied alongside apportionment for the minerogenic component of fine-grained sediment ingressing the benthos. The findings suggest that human septic waste contributes to the interstitial fines ingressing salmonid spawning habitat in the study area.

sediment-bound organic matter, fingerprinting, carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, near infra-red reflectance spectroscopy, spawning gravels, septic tanks
0048-9697
181-195
Collins, A.L.
eb72a479-2336-4268-a837-79d926239de3
Williams, L.J.
0ef5d6b0-9ba9-474d-96f5-889ba59ae9b0
Zhang, Y.S.
34c17a9a-9b9d-46df-8bb8-b42d95bf15b8
Marius, M.
4aedacc2-55b7-40c9-bbe4-3934f0605142
Dungait, J.A.J.
1f5635ef-ca0c-483f-8702-6553661858c4
Smallman, D.J.
b619a7d9-6214-407f-9e95-67b0c4bc7278
Dixon, E.R.
f76ac6c0-f95a-458e-8e64-43783d283ee9
Stringfellow, A.
024efba8-7ffc-441e-a268-be43240990a9
Sear, D.A.
ccd892ab-a93d-4073-a11c-b8bca42ecfd3
Jones, J.I.
9acb09cb-4a0d-4fcd-99cc-9bf198d9d564
Naden, P.S.
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Collins, A.L.
eb72a479-2336-4268-a837-79d926239de3
Williams, L.J.
0ef5d6b0-9ba9-474d-96f5-889ba59ae9b0
Zhang, Y.S.
34c17a9a-9b9d-46df-8bb8-b42d95bf15b8
Marius, M.
4aedacc2-55b7-40c9-bbe4-3934f0605142
Dungait, J.A.J.
1f5635ef-ca0c-483f-8702-6553661858c4
Smallman, D.J.
b619a7d9-6214-407f-9e95-67b0c4bc7278
Dixon, E.R.
f76ac6c0-f95a-458e-8e64-43783d283ee9
Stringfellow, A.
024efba8-7ffc-441e-a268-be43240990a9
Sear, D.A.
ccd892ab-a93d-4073-a11c-b8bca42ecfd3
Jones, J.I.
9acb09cb-4a0d-4fcd-99cc-9bf198d9d564
Naden, P.S.
94009f2b-9d27-4341-9fdd-daffc281d76d

Collins, A.L., Williams, L.J., Zhang, Y.S., Marius, M., Dungait, J.A.J., Smallman, D.J., Dixon, E.R., Stringfellow, A., Sear, D.A., Jones, J.I. and Naden, P.S. (2013) Catchment source contributions to the sediment-bound organic matter degrading salmonid spawning gravels in a lowland river, southern England. Science of the Total Environment, 456-457, 181-195. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.03.093).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The ingress of particulate material into freshwater spawning substrates is thought to be contributing to the declining success of salmonids reported over recent years for many rivers. Accordingly, the need for reliable information on the key sources of the sediment problem has progressed up the management agenda. Whilst previous work has focussed on apportioning the sources of minerogenic fine sediment degrading spawning habitats, there remains a need to develop procedures for generating corresponding information for the potentially harmful sediment-bound organic matter that represents an overlooked component of interstitial sediment. A source tracing procedure based on composite signatures combining bulk stable 13C and 15N isotope values with organic molecular structures detected using near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was therefore used to assess the primary sources of sediment-bound organic matter sampled from artificial spawning redds. Composite signatures were selected using a combination of the Kruskal–Wallis H-test, principal component analysis and GA-driven discriminant function analysis. Interstitial sediment samples were collected using time-integrating basket traps which were inserted at the start of the salmonid spawning season and extracted in conjunction with critical phases of fish development (eyeing, hatch, emergence, late spawning). Over the duration of these four basket extractions, the overall relative frequency-weighted average median (± 95% confidence limits) source contributions to the interstitial sediment-bound organic matter were estimated to be in the order: instream decaying vegetation (39 ± < 1%; full range 0–77%); damaged road verges (28 ± < 1%; full range 0–77%); septic tanks (22 ± < 1%; full range 0–50%), and; farm yard manures/slurries (11 ± < 1%; full range 0–61%). The reported procedure provides a promising basis for understanding the key sources of interstitial sediment-bound organic matter and can be applied alongside apportionment for the minerogenic component of fine-grained sediment ingressing the benthos. The findings suggest that human septic waste contributes to the interstitial fines ingressing salmonid spawning habitat in the study area.

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More information

Published date: 2013
Keywords: sediment-bound organic matter, fingerprinting, carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, near infra-red reflectance spectroscopy, spawning gravels, septic tanks
Organisations: Infrastructure Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352719
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352719
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: 8c37303d-6baa-4227-9b74-c1ee5335be7a
ORCID for A. Stringfellow: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8873-0010
ORCID for D.A. Sear: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0191-6179

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 May 2013 13:04
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:20

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Contributors

Author: A.L. Collins
Author: L.J. Williams
Author: Y.S. Zhang
Author: M. Marius
Author: J.A.J. Dungait
Author: D.J. Smallman
Author: E.R. Dixon
Author: A. Stringfellow ORCID iD
Author: D.A. Sear ORCID iD
Author: J.I. Jones
Author: P.S. Naden

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