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Variable immune-driven natural selection in the attachment (G) glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus

Variable immune-driven natural selection in the attachment (G) glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus
Variable immune-driven natural selection in the attachment (G) glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus
A maximum-likelihood analysis of selection pressures acting on the attachment (G) glycoprotein gene of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) from humans (HRSV) and bovines (BRSV) is presented. Six positively selected sites were identified in both group A and group B of HRSV, although only one site was common between them, while no positively selected sites were detected in BRSV. All positively selected sites were located within the ectodomain of the G protein and showed some association with positions of immunoglobulin (Ig) epitopes and sites of O-glycosylation. These results suggest that immune (antibody)-driven natural selection is an important determinant of RSV evolution and that this selection pressure differs among strains. The passage histories of RSV strains were also shown to affect the distribution of positively selected sites, particularly in HRSV B, and should be considered whenever retrospective analysis of adaptive evolution is undertaken.
respiratory syncytial virus, positive selection, maximum likelihood, glycosylation passage history, immune selection
0022-2844
182-192
Woelk, Christopher H.
4d3af0fd-658f-4626-b3b5-49a6192bcf7d
Holmes, Edward C.
0dab0ee7-07f4-429c-a809-e181fde89b0f
Woelk, Christopher H.
4d3af0fd-658f-4626-b3b5-49a6192bcf7d
Holmes, Edward C.
0dab0ee7-07f4-429c-a809-e181fde89b0f

Woelk, Christopher H. and Holmes, Edward C. (2001) Variable immune-driven natural selection in the attachment (G) glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus. Journal of Molecular Evolution, 52 (2), 182-192. (doi:10.1007/s002390010147). (PMID:11231898)

Record type: Article

Abstract

A maximum-likelihood analysis of selection pressures acting on the attachment (G) glycoprotein gene of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) from humans (HRSV) and bovines (BRSV) is presented. Six positively selected sites were identified in both group A and group B of HRSV, although only one site was common between them, while no positively selected sites were detected in BRSV. All positively selected sites were located within the ectodomain of the G protein and showed some association with positions of immunoglobulin (Ig) epitopes and sites of O-glycosylation. These results suggest that immune (antibody)-driven natural selection is an important determinant of RSV evolution and that this selection pressure differs among strains. The passage histories of RSV strains were also shown to affect the distribution of positively selected sites, particularly in HRSV B, and should be considered whenever retrospective analysis of adaptive evolution is undertaken.

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More information

Published date: February 2001
Keywords: respiratory syncytial virus, positive selection, maximum likelihood, glycosylation passage history, immune selection
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352722
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352722
ISSN: 0022-2844
PURE UUID: f0742a24-5b30-4449-98cd-e7c51dfc66d7

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jun 2013 09:30
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:33

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