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Crop evolution: from genetics to genomics

Crop evolution: from genetics to genomics
Crop evolution: from genetics to genomics
The advent of the genomics age has greatly facilitated the study of crop evolution. While full-scale genome sequencing projects are underway for just a handful of crop plants, recent years have witnessed a tremendous increase in the availability of DNA sequence data for virtually all major crops. Such resources have bolstered ‘traditional’ genetic approaches such as QTL mapping and candidate gene-based association studies. They have also allowed us to undertake genome-wide analyses in which we simultaneously consider the importance of a large and essentially random collection of genes. These sorts of analyses promise a more or less unbiased view of the genetic basis of crop evolution and will probably result in the identification of agronomically important genes that would have otherwise been overlooked.
0959-437X
525-532
Burke, J.M.
5110d8b4-546a-4e5d-9fa0-9ae93a818c09
Burger, J.C.
441d7bf5-cbb9-466a-99aa-624eaed62ccd
Chapman, M.A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, J.M.
5110d8b4-546a-4e5d-9fa0-9ae93a818c09
Burger, J.C.
441d7bf5-cbb9-466a-99aa-624eaed62ccd
Chapman, M.A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383

Burke, J.M., Burger, J.C. and Chapman, M.A. (2007) Crop evolution: from genetics to genomics. Current Opinion in Genetics & Development, 17 (6), 525-532. (doi:10.1016/j.gde.2007.09.003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The advent of the genomics age has greatly facilitated the study of crop evolution. While full-scale genome sequencing projects are underway for just a handful of crop plants, recent years have witnessed a tremendous increase in the availability of DNA sequence data for virtually all major crops. Such resources have bolstered ‘traditional’ genetic approaches such as QTL mapping and candidate gene-based association studies. They have also allowed us to undertake genome-wide analyses in which we simultaneously consider the importance of a large and essentially random collection of genes. These sorts of analyses promise a more or less unbiased view of the genetic basis of crop evolution and will probably result in the identification of agronomically important genes that would have otherwise been overlooked.

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More information

Published date: December 2007
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352736
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352736
ISSN: 0959-437X
PURE UUID: d6cc9236-607c-402e-8b6f-98bbe9de3d6e
ORCID for M.A. Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jun 2013 14:27
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:37

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Contributors

Author: J.M. Burke
Author: J.C. Burger
Author: M.A. Chapman ORCID iD

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