The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Letting the gene out of the bottle: the population genetics of genetically modified crops

Letting the gene out of the bottle: the population genetics of genetically modified crops
Letting the gene out of the bottle: the population genetics of genetically modified crops
Genetically modified (GM) plants are rapidly becoming a common feature of modern agriculture. This transition to engineered crops has been driven by a variety of potential benefits, both economic and ecological. The increase in the use of GM crops has, however, been accompanied by growing concerns regarding their potential impact on the environment. Here, we focus on the escape of transgenes from cultivation via crop × wild hybridization. We begin by reviewing the literature on natural hybridization, with particular reference to gene flow between crop plants and their wild relatives. We further show that natural selection, and not the overall rate of gene flow, is the most important factor governing the spread of favorable alleles. Hence, much of this review focuses on the likely effects of transgenes once they escape. Finally, we consider strategies for transgene containment.
0028-646X
429-443
Chapman, M.A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, J.M.
5110d8b4-546a-4e5d-9fa0-9ae93a818c09
Chapman, M.A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, J.M.
5110d8b4-546a-4e5d-9fa0-9ae93a818c09

Chapman, M.A. and Burke, J.M. (2006) Letting the gene out of the bottle: the population genetics of genetically modified crops. New Phytologist, 170 (3), 429-443. (doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2006.01710.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Genetically modified (GM) plants are rapidly becoming a common feature of modern agriculture. This transition to engineered crops has been driven by a variety of potential benefits, both economic and ecological. The increase in the use of GM crops has, however, been accompanied by growing concerns regarding their potential impact on the environment. Here, we focus on the escape of transgenes from cultivation via crop × wild hybridization. We begin by reviewing the literature on natural hybridization, with particular reference to gene flow between crop plants and their wild relatives. We further show that natural selection, and not the overall rate of gene flow, is the most important factor governing the spread of favorable alleles. Hence, much of this review focuses on the likely effects of transgenes once they escape. Finally, we consider strategies for transgene containment.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 12 April 2006
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352739
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352739
ISSN: 0028-646X
PURE UUID: cd40b921-02f6-4456-9329-fc1f8feea6fc
ORCID for M.A. Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jun 2013 14:34
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×