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Genetic divergence and hybrid speciation

Genetic divergence and hybrid speciation
Genetic divergence and hybrid speciation
Although the evolutionary importance of natural hybridization has been debated for decades, it has become increasingly clear that hybridization plays a fundamental role in the evolution of many plant and animal taxa, sometimes resulting in the formation of entirely new species. Although some hybrid species retain the base chromosome number of their parents, others combine the full chromosomal complements of their progenitors. Hybrid speciation can thus produce two fundamentally different types of evolutionary lineages, yet relatively little is known about the factors influencing ploidy level in hybrid neospecies. We estimated genetic divergence between species pairs that have given rise to homoploid and polyploid hybrid species and found that divergence is significantly greater for the parents of polyploids, even after controlling for potentially confounding factors. Our data thus provide the first direct evidence in support of the notion that the extent of genomic divergence between hybridizing species influences the likelihood of diploid versus polyploid hybrid speciation.
allopolyploid, genetic divergence, homoploid, hybridization, polyploidy, speciation
0014-3820
1773-1780
Chapman, M.A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, J.M.
5110d8b4-546a-4e5d-9fa0-9ae93a818c09
Chapman, M.A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, J.M.
5110d8b4-546a-4e5d-9fa0-9ae93a818c09

Chapman, M.A. and Burke, J.M. (2007) Genetic divergence and hybrid speciation. Evolution, 61 (7), 1773-1780. (doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00134.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although the evolutionary importance of natural hybridization has been debated for decades, it has become increasingly clear that hybridization plays a fundamental role in the evolution of many plant and animal taxa, sometimes resulting in the formation of entirely new species. Although some hybrid species retain the base chromosome number of their parents, others combine the full chromosomal complements of their progenitors. Hybrid speciation can thus produce two fundamentally different types of evolutionary lineages, yet relatively little is known about the factors influencing ploidy level in hybrid neospecies. We estimated genetic divergence between species pairs that have given rise to homoploid and polyploid hybrid species and found that divergence is significantly greater for the parents of polyploids, even after controlling for potentially confounding factors. Our data thus provide the first direct evidence in support of the notion that the extent of genomic divergence between hybridizing species influences the likelihood of diploid versus polyploid hybrid speciation.

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More information

Published date: May 2007
Keywords: allopolyploid, genetic divergence, homoploid, hybridization, polyploidy, speciation
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352742
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352742
ISSN: 0014-3820
PURE UUID: 884c27fa-06d4-44fa-be28-a4aefe4116d6
ORCID for M.A. Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X

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Date deposited: 03 Jun 2013 15:35
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:36

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Contributors

Author: M.A. Chapman ORCID iD
Author: J.M. Burke

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