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Evidence of selection on fatty acid biosynthetic genes during the evolution of cultivated sunflower

Evidence of selection on fatty acid biosynthetic genes during the evolution of cultivated sunflower
Evidence of selection on fatty acid biosynthetic genes during the evolution of cultivated sunflower
The identification of genes underlying the phenotypic transitions that took place during crop evolution, as well as the genomic extent of resultant selective sweeps, is of great interest to both evolutionary biologists and applied plant scientists. In this study, we report the results of a molecular evolutionary analysis of 11 genes that underlie fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolism in wild and cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Seven of these 11 genes showed evidence of selection at the nucleotide level, with 1 (FAD7) having experienced selection prior to domestication, 2 (FAD2-3 and FAD3) having experienced selection during domestication, and 4 (FAB1, FAD2-1, FAD6, and FATB) having experienced selection during the subsequent period of improvement. Sequencing of a subset of these genes from an extended panel of sunflower cultivars revealed little additional variation, and an analysis of the genomic region surrounding one of these genes (FAD2-1) revealed the occurrence of an extensive selective sweep affecting a region spanning at least ca. 100 kb. Given that previous population genetic analyses have revealed a relatively rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium in sunflower, this finding indicates the occurrence of strong selection and a rapid sweep.
0040-5752
897-907
Chapman, Mark
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, John M.
f74dabe1-09b5-4473-9860-6eb876588d09
Chapman, Mark
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Burke, John M.
f74dabe1-09b5-4473-9860-6eb876588d09

Chapman, Mark and Burke, John M. (2012) Evidence of selection on fatty acid biosynthetic genes during the evolution of cultivated sunflower. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 125 (5), 897-907. (doi:10.1007/s00122-012-1881-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The identification of genes underlying the phenotypic transitions that took place during crop evolution, as well as the genomic extent of resultant selective sweeps, is of great interest to both evolutionary biologists and applied plant scientists. In this study, we report the results of a molecular evolutionary analysis of 11 genes that underlie fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolism in wild and cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Seven of these 11 genes showed evidence of selection at the nucleotide level, with 1 (FAD7) having experienced selection prior to domestication, 2 (FAD2-3 and FAD3) having experienced selection during domestication, and 4 (FAB1, FAD2-1, FAD6, and FATB) having experienced selection during the subsequent period of improvement. Sequencing of a subset of these genes from an extended panel of sunflower cultivars revealed little additional variation, and an analysis of the genomic region surrounding one of these genes (FAD2-1) revealed the occurrence of an extensive selective sweep affecting a region spanning at least ca. 100 kb. Given that previous population genetic analyses have revealed a relatively rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium in sunflower, this finding indicates the occurrence of strong selection and a rapid sweep.

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Published date: 1 September 2012
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352743
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352743
ISSN: 0040-5752
PURE UUID: ab3110af-1d59-4149-9f32-2bf6b30a563b
ORCID for Mark Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X

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Date deposited: 20 May 2013 13:22
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:38

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