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Population genetic analysis of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius; Asteraceae) reveals a Near Eastern origin and five centers of diversity

Population genetic analysis of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius; Asteraceae) reveals a Near Eastern origin and five centers of diversity
Population genetic analysis of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius; Asteraceae) reveals a Near Eastern origin and five centers of diversity
Analyses of genetic variation in crop gene pools are a powerful tool for investigating the origin and early evolution of crop lineages. Such analyses also have the potential to identify unique genetic resources for continued crop improvement. The oilseed crop safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) is believed to have been domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region, but up to 10 geographic centers of similarity throughout the world have been proposed based on morphology. Nuclear microsatellite analysis of accessions from each of the 10 proposed centers of similarity, as well as individuals of the progenitor species, suggested the presence of five genetic clusters (1, Europe; 2, Turkey–Iran–Iraq–Afghanistan; 3, Israel–Jordan–Syria; 4, Egypt–Ethiopia; and 5, the Far East–India–Pakistan). North American accessions, products of a secondary introduction from the native range, suggest that a subset of the native accessions harbor unique genetic diversity that could be useful in future breeding efforts. Overall, a Near Eastern origin of safflower was confirmed based on the genetic similarity between the progenitor and the Near Eastern safflower accessions, as well as previous archaeological finds. Genetic differentiation between geographical clusters of accessions is evident, although not to the degree proposed based on morphology.

asteraceae, carthamuscrop evolution, domestication, genetic variation, population structure, safflower
0002-9122
831-840
Chapman, Mark A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Hvala, John
86d1185b-c60c-4820-a263-6a5b6971029f
Strever, Jason
837e5945-76e5-403c-a48e-54463b098e90
Burke, John M.
f74dabe1-09b5-4473-9860-6eb876588d09
Chapman, Mark A.
8bac4a92-bfa7-4c3c-af29-9af852ef6383
Hvala, John
86d1185b-c60c-4820-a263-6a5b6971029f
Strever, Jason
837e5945-76e5-403c-a48e-54463b098e90
Burke, John M.
f74dabe1-09b5-4473-9860-6eb876588d09

Chapman, Mark A., Hvala, John, Strever, Jason and Burke, John M. (2010) Population genetic analysis of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius; Asteraceae) reveals a Near Eastern origin and five centers of diversity. American Journal of Botany, 97 (5), 831-840. (doi:10.3732/ajb.0900137).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Analyses of genetic variation in crop gene pools are a powerful tool for investigating the origin and early evolution of crop lineages. Such analyses also have the potential to identify unique genetic resources for continued crop improvement. The oilseed crop safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) is believed to have been domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region, but up to 10 geographic centers of similarity throughout the world have been proposed based on morphology. Nuclear microsatellite analysis of accessions from each of the 10 proposed centers of similarity, as well as individuals of the progenitor species, suggested the presence of five genetic clusters (1, Europe; 2, Turkey–Iran–Iraq–Afghanistan; 3, Israel–Jordan–Syria; 4, Egypt–Ethiopia; and 5, the Far East–India–Pakistan). North American accessions, products of a secondary introduction from the native range, suggest that a subset of the native accessions harbor unique genetic diversity that could be useful in future breeding efforts. Overall, a Near Eastern origin of safflower was confirmed based on the genetic similarity between the progenitor and the Near Eastern safflower accessions, as well as previous archaeological finds. Genetic differentiation between geographical clusters of accessions is evident, although not to the degree proposed based on morphology.

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More information

Published date: 2010
Additional Information: Times Cited: 4
Keywords: asteraceae, carthamuscrop evolution, domestication, genetic variation, population structure, safflower
Organisations: Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352746
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352746
ISSN: 0002-9122
PURE UUID: c8525c72-e80f-423f-920d-acfc8acb04be
ORCID for Mark A. Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7151-723X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 May 2013 13:38
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:25

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Contributors

Author: Mark A. Chapman ORCID iD
Author: John Hvala
Author: Jason Strever
Author: John M. Burke

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