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Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults

Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults
Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults
Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has recently received increased attention. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify nutritional factors that contribute to loss of muscle mass. The role of protein, acid-base balance, vitamin D/calcium, and other minor nutrients like B vitamins was reviewed. Muscle wasting is a multifactorial process involving intrinsic and extrinsic alterations. A loss of fast twitch fibers, glycation of proteins, and insulin resistance may play an important role in the loss of muscle strength and development of sarcopenia. Protein intake plays an integral part in muscle health and an intake of 1.0-1.2 g/kg of body weight per day is probably optimal for older adults. There is a moderate inverse relationship between vitamin D status and muscle strength. Chronic ingestion of acid-producing diets appears to have a negative impact on muscle performance, and decreases in vitamin B12 and folic acid intake may also impair muscle function through their action on homocysteine. An adequate nutritional intake and an optimal dietary acid-base balance are important elements of any strategy to preserve muscle mass and strength during aging.
aging, iof, malnutrition, muscle strength, loss, nutritional, recommendations, sarcopenia
0937-941X
1555-1566
Mithal, A.
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Bonjour, J.P.
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Boonen, S.
19c70ece-493f-4b7c-9bf9-5e4a4a887ba4
Burckhardt, P.
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Degens, H.
a159f8a3-7363-464e-8778-2f09dc13f4f2
El Hajj, F.G.
3559308a-1111-4193-9ce2-c843054090e0
Josse, R.
ef6dd7a2-7db6-4f1f-aedf-b8a8fc1e7a4d
Lips, P.
c17c31d2-f4d8-457f-99ad-fa5af27723ca
Torres, J.M.
cf538dcc-6a66-4551-9973-c9f1ce61cdc4
Rizzoli, R.
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Yoshimura, N.
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Wahl, D.A.
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Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dawson-Hughes, B.
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Mithal, A.
6cc761d7-4f6c-4578-b526-0b106d897715
Bonjour, J.P.
915e6e36-3a33-4679-b20a-98a1f571a14c
Boonen, S.
19c70ece-493f-4b7c-9bf9-5e4a4a887ba4
Burckhardt, P.
66f9ffd0-3abd-45cf-bb79-d4557dd37ea1
Degens, H.
a159f8a3-7363-464e-8778-2f09dc13f4f2
El Hajj, F.G.
3559308a-1111-4193-9ce2-c843054090e0
Josse, R.
ef6dd7a2-7db6-4f1f-aedf-b8a8fc1e7a4d
Lips, P.
c17c31d2-f4d8-457f-99ad-fa5af27723ca
Torres, J.M.
cf538dcc-6a66-4551-9973-c9f1ce61cdc4
Rizzoli, R.
2214fb77-8fb7-4c0b-bfc4-9f8d3cace5d7
Yoshimura, N.
a10d916f-afc1-4f89-a7e3-a690e16b4cdd
Wahl, D.A.
32cf9afd-a852-4818-aad2-e6fb29443059
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dawson-Hughes, B.
126652ed-871a-4982-be68-0b4db9254ec7

Mithal, A., Bonjour, J.P., Boonen, S., Burckhardt, P., Degens, H., El Hajj, F.G., Josse, R., Lips, P., Torres, J.M., Rizzoli, R., Yoshimura, N., Wahl, D.A., Cooper, C. and Dawson-Hughes, B. (2013) Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults. Osteoporosis International, 24 (5), 1555-1566. (doi:10.1007/s00198-012-2236-y). (PMID:23247327)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has recently received increased attention. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify nutritional factors that contribute to loss of muscle mass. The role of protein, acid-base balance, vitamin D/calcium, and other minor nutrients like B vitamins was reviewed. Muscle wasting is a multifactorial process involving intrinsic and extrinsic alterations. A loss of fast twitch fibers, glycation of proteins, and insulin resistance may play an important role in the loss of muscle strength and development of sarcopenia. Protein intake plays an integral part in muscle health and an intake of 1.0-1.2 g/kg of body weight per day is probably optimal for older adults. There is a moderate inverse relationship between vitamin D status and muscle strength. Chronic ingestion of acid-producing diets appears to have a negative impact on muscle performance, and decreases in vitamin B12 and folic acid intake may also impair muscle function through their action on homocysteine. An adequate nutritional intake and an optimal dietary acid-base balance are important elements of any strategy to preserve muscle mass and strength during aging.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 18 December 2012
Published date: May 2013
Keywords: aging, iof, malnutrition, muscle strength, loss, nutritional, recommendations, sarcopenia
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352941
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352941
ISSN: 0937-941X
PURE UUID: 8999f7e6-b957-42ae-8d2d-13a475a0c804
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 22 May 2013 11:22
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:56

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Contributors

Author: A. Mithal
Author: J.P. Bonjour
Author: S. Boonen
Author: P. Burckhardt
Author: H. Degens
Author: F.G. El Hajj
Author: R. Josse
Author: P. Lips
Author: J.M. Torres
Author: R. Rizzoli
Author: N. Yoshimura
Author: D.A. Wahl
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: B. Dawson-Hughes

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