The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

What controls tropical forest architecture? Testing environmental, structural and floristic drivers

What controls tropical forest architecture? Testing environmental, structural and floristic drivers
What controls tropical forest architecture? Testing environmental, structural and floristic drivers
Aim: To test the extent to which the vertical structure of tropical forests is determined by environment, forest structure or biogeographical history.

Location: Pan-tropical.

Methods: Using height and diameter data from 20,497 trees in 112 non-contiguous plots, asymptotic maximum height (H AM) and height–diameter relationships were computed with nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) models to: (1) test for environmental and structural causes of differences among plots, and (2) test if there were continental differences once environment and structure were accounted for; persistence of differences may imply the importance of biogeography for vertical forest structure. NLME analyses for floristic subsets of data (only/excluding Fabaceae and only/excluding Dipterocarpaceae individuals) were used to examine whether family-level patterns revealed biogeographical explanations of cross-continental differences.

Results: H AM and allometry were significantly different amongst continents. H AM was greatest in Asian forests (58.3 ± 7.5?m, 95% CI), followed by forests in Africa (45.1 ± 2.6?m), America (35.8 ± 6.0?m) and Australia (35.0 ± 7.4?m), and height–diameter relationships varied similarly; for a given diameter, stems were tallest in Asia, followed by Africa, America and Australia. Precipitation seasonality, basal area, stem density, solar radiation and wood density each explained some variation in allometry and H AM yet continental differences persisted even after these were accounted for. Analyses using floristic subsets showed that significant continental differences in H AM and allometry persisted in all cases.

Main conclusions: Tree allometry and maximum height are altered by environmental conditions, forest structure and wood density. Yet, even after accounting for these, tropical forest architecture varies significantly from continent to continent. The greater stature of tropical forests in Asia is not directly determined by the dominance of the family Dipterocarpaceae, as on average non-dipterocarps are equally tall. We hypothesise that dominant large-statured families create conditions in which only tall species can compete, thus perpetuating a forest dominated by tall individuals from diverse families.
allometry, architecture, dipterocarpaceae, ecology, fabaceae, function, height–diameter, maximum height, structure, tropical moist forest
1466-822X
1179-1190
Banin, L.
74bb0e70-dcf7-4196-a7ca-24b2147e4cad
Feldpausch, T.R.
1c46737d-74be-46d5-b28b-bac2001e98cb
Phillips, O.L.
fbbf2f11-9869-494d-b55a-7795bc47b64b
Baker, T.R.
9700d6f3-fc6e-490a-8f97-cf30c5ba0470
Lloyd, J.
9e93814a-879b-4b3d-9e71-73429412bf69
Affum-Baffoe, K.
fa2ae474-432c-440b-bf6b-4e1c30aec98f
Arets, E.J.M.M.
88ab8257-cd84-489b-86e1-aad7522623db
Berry, N.J.
ad397cb6-e130-4261-b67e-482ce4511798
Bradford, M.
b1387e03-2438-458f-ac41-21d1a3959e2c
Brienen, R.J.W.
f22268c3-4c6a-4936-8014-7683fb4fc637
Davies, S.
5b030b81-3805-489a-bb2a-96d9dff61b07
Drescher, M.
f341521d-2fd8-4248-80ec-f2794f7e5af5
Higuchi, N.
0e2bb771-8fe5-47ab-9e43-56276e7a9a40
Hilbert, D.W.
3fe7ae62-8274-446a-bc71-e84b5d293169
Hladik, A.
1dfc0edf-9e24-48d6-b656-b233ee67b436
Iida, Y.
61586ef3-2d4f-485a-9bc0-276bda531c37
Salim, K. Abu
3f7c5436-8bbd-413c-9890-71aa7d87a07b
Kassim, A.R.
c8c42517-1673-40ac-a3dd-6af7b20e90b7
King, D.A.
f4992d5c-e6cb-4bec-995e-b8296875bc63
Lopez-Gonzalez, G.
6d8d4e63-e029-423d-88c3-bfaf1b2993d0
Metcalfe, D.
2e55386d-f26e-498b-9629-074dfbaadfab
Nilus, R.
b9650975-a10f-46f5-9955-9750c21c52d0
Peh, K. S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Reitsma, J.M.
4dffecf4-e5d1-418f-ada2-9d818b584de3
Sonké, B.
03023061-2e15-455b-976d-6571d23b640c
Taedoumg, H.
ba34b675-8b1d-4007-a023-a9995ce9a515
Tan, S.
6ee9d7e3-0cd0-41b9-805e-9c4edba790b6
White, L.
67ad730f-e2c1-4e05-b79d-c2a9e55cabf5
Wöll, H.
d16443a0-04d2-4cd2-aee2-270e82132719
Lewis, S.L.
70048d3b-f6e0-4292-b08f-8eab49be2c43
Banin, L.
74bb0e70-dcf7-4196-a7ca-24b2147e4cad
Feldpausch, T.R.
1c46737d-74be-46d5-b28b-bac2001e98cb
Phillips, O.L.
fbbf2f11-9869-494d-b55a-7795bc47b64b
Baker, T.R.
9700d6f3-fc6e-490a-8f97-cf30c5ba0470
Lloyd, J.
9e93814a-879b-4b3d-9e71-73429412bf69
Affum-Baffoe, K.
fa2ae474-432c-440b-bf6b-4e1c30aec98f
Arets, E.J.M.M.
88ab8257-cd84-489b-86e1-aad7522623db
Berry, N.J.
ad397cb6-e130-4261-b67e-482ce4511798
Bradford, M.
b1387e03-2438-458f-ac41-21d1a3959e2c
Brienen, R.J.W.
f22268c3-4c6a-4936-8014-7683fb4fc637
Davies, S.
5b030b81-3805-489a-bb2a-96d9dff61b07
Drescher, M.
f341521d-2fd8-4248-80ec-f2794f7e5af5
Higuchi, N.
0e2bb771-8fe5-47ab-9e43-56276e7a9a40
Hilbert, D.W.
3fe7ae62-8274-446a-bc71-e84b5d293169
Hladik, A.
1dfc0edf-9e24-48d6-b656-b233ee67b436
Iida, Y.
61586ef3-2d4f-485a-9bc0-276bda531c37
Salim, K. Abu
3f7c5436-8bbd-413c-9890-71aa7d87a07b
Kassim, A.R.
c8c42517-1673-40ac-a3dd-6af7b20e90b7
King, D.A.
f4992d5c-e6cb-4bec-995e-b8296875bc63
Lopez-Gonzalez, G.
6d8d4e63-e029-423d-88c3-bfaf1b2993d0
Metcalfe, D.
2e55386d-f26e-498b-9629-074dfbaadfab
Nilus, R.
b9650975-a10f-46f5-9955-9750c21c52d0
Peh, K. S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Reitsma, J.M.
4dffecf4-e5d1-418f-ada2-9d818b584de3
Sonké, B.
03023061-2e15-455b-976d-6571d23b640c
Taedoumg, H.
ba34b675-8b1d-4007-a023-a9995ce9a515
Tan, S.
6ee9d7e3-0cd0-41b9-805e-9c4edba790b6
White, L.
67ad730f-e2c1-4e05-b79d-c2a9e55cabf5
Wöll, H.
d16443a0-04d2-4cd2-aee2-270e82132719
Lewis, S.L.
70048d3b-f6e0-4292-b08f-8eab49be2c43

Banin, L., Feldpausch, T.R., Phillips, O.L., Baker, T.R., Lloyd, J., Affum-Baffoe, K., Arets, E.J.M.M., Berry, N.J., Bradford, M., Brienen, R.J.W., Davies, S., Drescher, M., Higuchi, N., Hilbert, D.W., Hladik, A., Iida, Y., Salim, K. Abu, Kassim, A.R., King, D.A., Lopez-Gonzalez, G., Metcalfe, D., Nilus, R., Peh, K. S.-H., Reitsma, J.M., Sonké, B., Taedoumg, H., Tan, S., White, L., Wöll, H. and Lewis, S.L. (2012) What controls tropical forest architecture? Testing environmental, structural and floristic drivers. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21 (12), 1179-1190. (doi:10.1111/j.1466-8238.2012.00778.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: To test the extent to which the vertical structure of tropical forests is determined by environment, forest structure or biogeographical history.

Location: Pan-tropical.

Methods: Using height and diameter data from 20,497 trees in 112 non-contiguous plots, asymptotic maximum height (H AM) and height–diameter relationships were computed with nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) models to: (1) test for environmental and structural causes of differences among plots, and (2) test if there were continental differences once environment and structure were accounted for; persistence of differences may imply the importance of biogeography for vertical forest structure. NLME analyses for floristic subsets of data (only/excluding Fabaceae and only/excluding Dipterocarpaceae individuals) were used to examine whether family-level patterns revealed biogeographical explanations of cross-continental differences.

Results: H AM and allometry were significantly different amongst continents. H AM was greatest in Asian forests (58.3 ± 7.5?m, 95% CI), followed by forests in Africa (45.1 ± 2.6?m), America (35.8 ± 6.0?m) and Australia (35.0 ± 7.4?m), and height–diameter relationships varied similarly; for a given diameter, stems were tallest in Asia, followed by Africa, America and Australia. Precipitation seasonality, basal area, stem density, solar radiation and wood density each explained some variation in allometry and H AM yet continental differences persisted even after these were accounted for. Analyses using floristic subsets showed that significant continental differences in H AM and allometry persisted in all cases.

Main conclusions: Tree allometry and maximum height are altered by environmental conditions, forest structure and wood density. Yet, even after accounting for these, tropical forest architecture varies significantly from continent to continent. The greater stature of tropical forests in Asia is not directly determined by the dominance of the family Dipterocarpaceae, as on average non-dipterocarps are equally tall. We hypothesise that dominant large-statured families create conditions in which only tall species can compete, thus perpetuating a forest dominated by tall individuals from diverse families.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 20 July 2012
Published date: December 2012
Keywords: allometry, architecture, dipterocarpaceae, ecology, fabaceae, function, height–diameter, maximum height, structure, tropical moist forest
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352970
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352970
ISSN: 1466-822X
PURE UUID: f09c3b30-2b8c-46e3-b25c-22a0d73265af
ORCID for K. S.-H. Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2013 11:27
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: L. Banin
Author: T.R. Feldpausch
Author: O.L. Phillips
Author: T.R. Baker
Author: J. Lloyd
Author: K. Affum-Baffoe
Author: E.J.M.M. Arets
Author: N.J. Berry
Author: M. Bradford
Author: R.J.W. Brienen
Author: S. Davies
Author: M. Drescher
Author: N. Higuchi
Author: D.W. Hilbert
Author: A. Hladik
Author: Y. Iida
Author: K. Abu Salim
Author: A.R. Kassim
Author: D.A. King
Author: G. Lopez-Gonzalez
Author: D. Metcalfe
Author: R. Nilus
Author: K. S.-H. Peh ORCID iD
Author: J.M. Reitsma
Author: B. Sonké
Author: H. Taedoumg
Author: S. Tan
Author: L. White
Author: H. Wöll
Author: S.L. Lewis

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×