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Do insectivorous bird communities decline on land-bridge forest islands in Peninsular Malaysia?

Do insectivorous bird communities decline on land-bridge forest islands in Peninsular Malaysia?
Do insectivorous bird communities decline on land-bridge forest islands in Peninsular Malaysia?
To assess the impact of habitat fragmentation on tropical avian communities, we sampled lowland forest birds on six land-bridge islands and two mainland forest sites in Lake Kenyir, Peninsular Malaysia using timed point counts, hypothesizing that insectivorous birds are the worst affected guild. We used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate the effects of area, isolation, primary dietary guild (omnivore, frugivore and insectivore) and their interactions in predicting species richness, abundance and diversity. Our analysis showed that a model that considered the effects of area, dietary guild and their interaction best explained observed patterns of species richness. But a model considering both area and dietary guild best explained the variation in abundance. Notably, insectivorous birds were singled out as the dietary guild most sensitive to fragmentation, followed by frugivorous and omnivorous birds and hence provide support for our hypothesis. Assemblages of insectivorous birds were clearly depauperate on anthropogenic forest islands in Lake Kenyir and are consistent with forest fragmentation studies in the Neotropics. Given their specialized foraging ecology and diversity, conservation of intact communities of insectivorous bird guilds in Malaysia will be critical for maintaining predator–prey interactions in lowland tropical forests.
area effect, feeding guild, foraging ecology, forest cover, insectivorous birds, land-bridge islands, malaysia, sensitivity
0266-4674
1-14
Yong, Ding Li
cc8167e8-48be-412b-93d4-db2a16b599fe
Qie, Lan
1891c2ed-303c-4986-82f5-6e3b577dcd03
Sodhi, Navjot S.
3dcb4076-fe05-4a62-854e-ac587b5db377
Koh, Lian Pin
9dcf5d4c-bbdb-4603-952b-61f4c3530416
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Lee, Tien Ming
c641634e-36d4-49cc-80d9-08eba5e1b7e7
Lim, Haw Chuan
caf908d6-d5d8-4fde-bc2f-509eab3c491c
Lim, Susan L.-H.
a840bf53-2d67-4bea-8bca-2ab504878615
Yong, Ding Li
cc8167e8-48be-412b-93d4-db2a16b599fe
Qie, Lan
1891c2ed-303c-4986-82f5-6e3b577dcd03
Sodhi, Navjot S.
3dcb4076-fe05-4a62-854e-ac587b5db377
Koh, Lian Pin
9dcf5d4c-bbdb-4603-952b-61f4c3530416
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Lee, Tien Ming
c641634e-36d4-49cc-80d9-08eba5e1b7e7
Lim, Haw Chuan
caf908d6-d5d8-4fde-bc2f-509eab3c491c
Lim, Susan L.-H.
a840bf53-2d67-4bea-8bca-2ab504878615

Yong, Ding Li, Qie, Lan, Sodhi, Navjot S., Koh, Lian Pin, Peh, Kelvin S.-H., Lee, Tien Ming, Lim, Haw Chuan and Lim, Susan L.-H. (2011) Do insectivorous bird communities decline on land-bridge forest islands in Peninsular Malaysia? Journal of Tropical Ecology, 27 (1), 1-14. (doi:10.1017/S0266467410000520).

Record type: Article

Abstract

To assess the impact of habitat fragmentation on tropical avian communities, we sampled lowland forest birds on six land-bridge islands and two mainland forest sites in Lake Kenyir, Peninsular Malaysia using timed point counts, hypothesizing that insectivorous birds are the worst affected guild. We used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate the effects of area, isolation, primary dietary guild (omnivore, frugivore and insectivore) and their interactions in predicting species richness, abundance and diversity. Our analysis showed that a model that considered the effects of area, dietary guild and their interaction best explained observed patterns of species richness. But a model considering both area and dietary guild best explained the variation in abundance. Notably, insectivorous birds were singled out as the dietary guild most sensitive to fragmentation, followed by frugivorous and omnivorous birds and hence provide support for our hypothesis. Assemblages of insectivorous birds were clearly depauperate on anthropogenic forest islands in Lake Kenyir and are consistent with forest fragmentation studies in the Neotropics. Given their specialized foraging ecology and diversity, conservation of intact communities of insectivorous bird guilds in Malaysia will be critical for maintaining predator–prey interactions in lowland tropical forests.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 17 December 2010
Published date: January 2011
Keywords: area effect, feeding guild, foraging ecology, forest cover, insectivorous birds, land-bridge islands, malaysia, sensitivity
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352982
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352982
ISSN: 0266-4674
PURE UUID: 48eed4e3-5d89-4f4c-a087-3d4d5c4a242a
ORCID for Kelvin S.-H. Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2013 13:11
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:36

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