The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Invasive species in Southeast Asia: the knowledge so far

Invasive species in Southeast Asia: the knowledge so far
Invasive species in Southeast Asia: the knowledge so far
This review deals with alien species invasion in Southeast Asia, an important conservation and management concern in the region. I report on the current and potential future impacts of biological invasions on biodiversity in Southeast Asia. Current knowledge of the invasive species in Southeast Asia is mostly based on anecdotal observations. Nevertheless, I attempt to compile existing empirical evidence on the negative effects of the biological invaders found in the region. These impacts include displacement of native biota, modification of ecosystems, hybridization, environmental disturbance, and economic loss. Any effective counter-measure will need to involve a multi-national strategy, yet such measure is challenging due to a broad spectrum of political and economic development models among the Southeast Asian countries. An overview of the taxonomic structure of the invasive species in Southeast Asia shows that the invasive plant and fish are the most represented taxonomic groups in all countries. The current research effort in invasion ecology from Southeast Asia is not being up to international standard in comparison to other regions, and the absence of recent international journal articles on invasive plant species reveals the biases in biological invasion-related research. The lack of research capacity and financial support from governments, and the inability to disseminate scholarly data in international journals are the possible reasons for the dearth of research literature on biological invasions from the region. Finally, a forward-looking agenda for the region should include improving the quality and quantity of biological invasion research; adopting a tough approach to the illegal release of wildlife; and applying multi-national strategies that integrate data sharing, prioritization, public awareness, policy work, capacity building, conservation actions and surveillance.
1083-1099
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc

Peh, Kelvin S.-H. (2010) Invasive species in Southeast Asia: the knowledge so far. Biodiversity and Conservation, 19 (4), 1083-1099. (doi:10.1007/s10531-009-9755-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This review deals with alien species invasion in Southeast Asia, an important conservation and management concern in the region. I report on the current and potential future impacts of biological invasions on biodiversity in Southeast Asia. Current knowledge of the invasive species in Southeast Asia is mostly based on anecdotal observations. Nevertheless, I attempt to compile existing empirical evidence on the negative effects of the biological invaders found in the region. These impacts include displacement of native biota, modification of ecosystems, hybridization, environmental disturbance, and economic loss. Any effective counter-measure will need to involve a multi-national strategy, yet such measure is challenging due to a broad spectrum of political and economic development models among the Southeast Asian countries. An overview of the taxonomic structure of the invasive species in Southeast Asia shows that the invasive plant and fish are the most represented taxonomic groups in all countries. The current research effort in invasion ecology from Southeast Asia is not being up to international standard in comparison to other regions, and the absence of recent international journal articles on invasive plant species reveals the biases in biological invasion-related research. The lack of research capacity and financial support from governments, and the inability to disseminate scholarly data in international journals are the possible reasons for the dearth of research literature on biological invasions from the region. Finally, a forward-looking agenda for the region should include improving the quality and quantity of biological invasion research; adopting a tough approach to the illegal release of wildlife; and applying multi-national strategies that integrate data sharing, prioritization, public awareness, policy work, capacity building, conservation actions and surveillance.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 April 2010
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353006
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353006
PURE UUID: 69b1dee5-7383-4ebe-bac4-2ca808530d98
ORCID for Kelvin S.-H. Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 May 2013 10:29
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×