Self-focus and procedural fairness: the role of self-rumination and self-reflection


Brebels, Lieven, Cremer, David, Sedikides, Constantine and Van Hiel, Alain (2013) Self-focus and procedural fairness: the role of self-rumination and self-reflection Social Justice Research, 26, (2), pp. 151-167. (doi:10.1007/s11211-013-0180-4).

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Description/Abstract

This article examined the differential role of self-rumination and self-reflection on the psychological influence of procedural fairness. Study 1 induced self-rumination and self-reflection relative to an outward-focused control. Self-rumination increased the perceived importance of procedural fairness, whereas self-reflection decreased it. Study 2, assessing individual differences in self-rumination and self-reflection, showed that a standard procedural fairness manipulation (voice vs. no voice) predicted future interaction preferences with the enactment source among those high (but not low) in self-rumination and among those low (but not high) in self-reflection. The findings validate a multiple process approach to understanding the role of the self in procedural fairness.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1007/s11211-013-0180-4
Keywords: procedural fairness, self, self-focus, self-rumination, self-re?ection
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Organisations: Psychology
ePrint ID: 353016
Date :
Date Event
13 March 2013e-pub ahead of print
June 2013Published
Date Deposited: 23 May 2013 11:46
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2017 15:28
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353016

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