The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Physio-chemical hydrodynamic mechanism underlying the formation of thin adsorbed boundary films

Physio-chemical hydrodynamic mechanism underlying the formation of thin adsorbed boundary films
Physio-chemical hydrodynamic mechanism underlying the formation of thin adsorbed boundary films
Formation of low shear strength surface-adhered thin films mitigates excessive friction in mixed or boundary regimes of lubrication. Tribo-films are formed as a consequence of molecular chemical reaction with the surfaces. The process is best viewed in the context of a lubricant-surface system. Therefore, it is usually surmised that the adsorption of lubricant molecular species to the contact surfaces would be underlying to the formation of ultra-thin lubricant films. The paper considers contact of smooth surfaces at close separation. This may be regarded as the contact of a pair of asperity summits, whose dimensions, however small, are far larger than the size of fluid molecules within the conjunction. In such diminishing separations the constraining effect of relatively smooth solid barriers causes oscillatory solvation of fluid molecules. This effect accounts for the conjunctional load capacity but does not contribute to mitigating friction, except when molecular adsorption is taken into account with long chain molecules which tend to inhibit solvation. The paper presents an analytical predictive model based on the Ornstein-Zernike method with Percus-Yevick approximation of a narrow interaction potential between conjunctional composition. The predictions confirm the above stated physical facts in a fundamental manner.
0301-7249
123-136
Chong, W.W.F.
ddfcee50-9898-41be-b32c-b1b9932a1748
Teodorescu, M.
10e22073-39f7-41c3-b2b7-2886c2d976f6
Rahnejat, H.
f5b9b13a-dc42-4fde-a98d-4e0c48bb19ab
Chong, W.W.F.
ddfcee50-9898-41be-b32c-b1b9932a1748
Teodorescu, M.
10e22073-39f7-41c3-b2b7-2886c2d976f6
Rahnejat, H.
f5b9b13a-dc42-4fde-a98d-4e0c48bb19ab

Chong, W.W.F., Teodorescu, M. and Rahnejat, H. (2012) Physio-chemical hydrodynamic mechanism underlying the formation of thin adsorbed boundary films. Faraday Discussions, 156, 123-136. (doi:10.1039/C2FD00118G).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Formation of low shear strength surface-adhered thin films mitigates excessive friction in mixed or boundary regimes of lubrication. Tribo-films are formed as a consequence of molecular chemical reaction with the surfaces. The process is best viewed in the context of a lubricant-surface system. Therefore, it is usually surmised that the adsorption of lubricant molecular species to the contact surfaces would be underlying to the formation of ultra-thin lubricant films. The paper considers contact of smooth surfaces at close separation. This may be regarded as the contact of a pair of asperity summits, whose dimensions, however small, are far larger than the size of fluid molecules within the conjunction. In such diminishing separations the constraining effect of relatively smooth solid barriers causes oscillatory solvation of fluid molecules. This effect accounts for the conjunctional load capacity but does not contribute to mitigating friction, except when molecular adsorption is taken into account with long chain molecules which tend to inhibit solvation. The paper presents an analytical predictive model based on the Ornstein-Zernike method with Percus-Yevick approximation of a narrow interaction potential between conjunctional composition. The predictions confirm the above stated physical facts in a fundamental manner.

PDF
Paper.pdf - Author's Original
Download (967kB)

More information

Published date: 2 July 2012
Organisations: nCATS Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353119
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353119
ISSN: 0301-7249
PURE UUID: 109039a3-7ca1-4b81-bbd5-42291fdcd0e6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jun 2013 08:50
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:07

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×