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Pregnancy: occupational aspects of management: concise guidance

Pregnancy: occupational aspects of management: concise guidance
Pregnancy: occupational aspects of management: concise guidance
Most pregnant women are exposed to some physical activity at work. This Concise Guidance is aimed at doctors advising healthy women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies about the risks arising from five common workplace exposures (prolonged working hours, shift work, lifting, standing and heavy physical workload). The adverse outcomes considered are: miscarriage, preterm delivery, small for gestational age, low birth weight, pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension. Systematic review of the literature indicates that these exposures are unlikely to carry much of an increased risk for any of the outcomes, since small apparent effects might be explicable in terms of chance, bias, or confounding, while larger and better studies yield lower estimated risks compared with smaller and weaker studies. In general, patients can be reassured that such work is associated with little, if any, adverse effect on pregnancy. Moreover, moderate physical exercise is thought to be healthy in pregnancy and most pregnant women undertake some physical work at home. The guidelines provide risk estimates and advice on counselling.
1470-2118
75-79
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Bonzini, M.
0cd0ca2c-a67c-4ec4-95ee-7c93060d47a1
Bonde, J.P.
1ecb9620-1893-45be-baf1-84a744610876
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Bonzini, M.
0cd0ca2c-a67c-4ec4-95ee-7c93060d47a1
Bonde, J.P.
1ecb9620-1893-45be-baf1-84a744610876

Palmer, K.T., Bonzini, M. and Bonde, J.P. (2013) Pregnancy: occupational aspects of management: concise guidance. Clinical Medicine, 13 (1), 75-79. (doi:10.7861/clinmedicine.13-1-75). (PMID:23472500)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Most pregnant women are exposed to some physical activity at work. This Concise Guidance is aimed at doctors advising healthy women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies about the risks arising from five common workplace exposures (prolonged working hours, shift work, lifting, standing and heavy physical workload). The adverse outcomes considered are: miscarriage, preterm delivery, small for gestational age, low birth weight, pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension. Systematic review of the literature indicates that these exposures are unlikely to carry much of an increased risk for any of the outcomes, since small apparent effects might be explicable in terms of chance, bias, or confounding, while larger and better studies yield lower estimated risks compared with smaller and weaker studies. In general, patients can be reassured that such work is associated with little, if any, adverse effect on pregnancy. Moreover, moderate physical exercise is thought to be healthy in pregnancy and most pregnant women undertake some physical work at home. The guidelines provide risk estimates and advice on counselling.

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Published date: February 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 353161
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353161
ISSN: 1470-2118
PURE UUID: acddb590-437f-4230-ae84-3dfbdc494660

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Date deposited: 03 Jun 2013 11:06
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:31

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Contributors

Author: K.T. Palmer
Author: M. Bonzini
Author: J.P. Bonde

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