The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Provenance in distributed systems: a process algebraic study of provenance management and its role in establishing trust in data quality

Provenance in distributed systems: a process algebraic study of provenance management and its role in establishing trust in data quality
Provenance in distributed systems: a process algebraic study of provenance management and its role in establishing trust in data quality
We aim to develop a formal framework to reason about provenance in distributed systems. We take as our starting point an extension of the asynchronous pi-calculus where processes are explicitly assigned principal identities. We enrich this basic setting with provenance annotated data, dynamic provenance tracking and dynamically checked trust policies. We give several examples to illustrate the use of the calculus in modelling systems where principals base their trust in the quality of data on the provenance information associated with it.

We consider the role of provenance in the calculus by relating the provenance tracking semantics to a plain one in which no provenance tracking or checking takes place. We further substantiate this by studying bisimulation-based behavioural equivalences for the plain and annotated versions of the calculus and contrasting the discriminating power of the equivalences obtained in each case. We also give a more denotational take on the semantics of the provenance calculus and look at notions of well-formedness and soundness for the provenance tracking semantics.

We consider two different extensions of the basic calculus. The first aims to alleviate the cost of run time provenance tracking and checking by defining a static type system which guarantees that in well-typed systems principals always receive data with provenance that matches their requirements. The second extension looks at the ramifications of provenance tracking on privacy and security policies and consists of extending the calculus with a notion we call filters. This gives principals the ability to assign different views of the provenance of a given value to different principals, thus allowing for the selective disclosure of provenance information. We study behavioural equivalences for this extension of the calculus, paying particular attention to the set of principals composing the observer and its role in discriminating between systems.
Souilah, Issam
3b40036e-cec0-4f3f-b666-29caecfa3236
Souilah, Issam
3b40036e-cec0-4f3f-b666-29caecfa3236
Sassone, Vladimiro
df7d3c83-2aa0-4571-be94-9473b07b03e7

Souilah, Issam (2013) Provenance in distributed systems: a process algebraic study of provenance management and its role in establishing trust in data quality. University of Southampton, Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Doctoral Thesis, 236pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

We aim to develop a formal framework to reason about provenance in distributed systems. We take as our starting point an extension of the asynchronous pi-calculus where processes are explicitly assigned principal identities. We enrich this basic setting with provenance annotated data, dynamic provenance tracking and dynamically checked trust policies. We give several examples to illustrate the use of the calculus in modelling systems where principals base their trust in the quality of data on the provenance information associated with it.

We consider the role of provenance in the calculus by relating the provenance tracking semantics to a plain one in which no provenance tracking or checking takes place. We further substantiate this by studying bisimulation-based behavioural equivalences for the plain and annotated versions of the calculus and contrasting the discriminating power of the equivalences obtained in each case. We also give a more denotational take on the semantics of the provenance calculus and look at notions of well-formedness and soundness for the provenance tracking semantics.

We consider two different extensions of the basic calculus. The first aims to alleviate the cost of run time provenance tracking and checking by defining a static type system which guarantees that in well-typed systems principals always receive data with provenance that matches their requirements. The second extension looks at the ramifications of provenance tracking on privacy and security policies and consists of extending the calculus with a notion we call filters. This gives principals the ability to assign different views of the provenance of a given value to different principals, thus allowing for the selective disclosure of provenance information. We study behavioural equivalences for this extension of the calculus, paying particular attention to the set of principals composing the observer and its role in discriminating between systems.

Text
ISouilah-Thesis.pdf - Other
Download (1MB)

More information

Published date: March 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353288
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353288
PURE UUID: 5d0f9574-f935-43c0-b757-3f4fdb3029d0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jun 2013 13:58
Last modified: 13 Sep 2017 16:33

Export record

Contributors

Author: Issam Souilah
Thesis advisor: Vladimiro Sassone

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×