The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The Interpretability Hypothesis again: a partial replication of Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou (2007)

The Interpretability Hypothesis again: a partial replication of Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou (2007)
The Interpretability Hypothesis again: a partial replication of Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou (2007)
Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou (2007) propose the Interpretability Hypothesis (IH), according to which uninterpretable features present an insurmountable difficulty in adult second language acquisition. The experimental study supporting the IH examines Greek native speakers’ knowledge of gaps versus resumptive pronouns in English wh-movement. A crucial assumption is that Greek allows resumptives optionally. Alexopoulou and Keller’s (2002, 2007) findings confirm that assumption. In our replication of Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou’s study, we divide Spanish native speakers into those who accept resumptives and those who do not; then we look at their acceptance of gaps and resumptives in English. The results indicate that both groups of advanced learners, those that do and those that don’t have resumptives in their individual grammars, have acquired the ungrammaticality of resumptives in English, although there may be lingering native language effects. The effects of d-linking, animacy, syntactic function of the resumptive/gap (subject vs. object), and presence of the complementizer "that" are also examined.
1367-0069
1 -21
Leal Mendez, Tania
02c996af-8c06-4244-bd7a-f297e2e5c4d0
Slabakova, Roumyana
1bda11ce-ce3d-4146-8ae3-4a486b6f5bde
Leal Mendez, Tania
02c996af-8c06-4244-bd7a-f297e2e5c4d0
Slabakova, Roumyana
1bda11ce-ce3d-4146-8ae3-4a486b6f5bde

Leal Mendez, Tania and Slabakova, Roumyana (2012) The Interpretability Hypothesis again: a partial replication of Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou (2007). International Journal of Bilingualism, n/a, 1 -21. (doi:10.1177/1367006912448125).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou (2007) propose the Interpretability Hypothesis (IH), according to which uninterpretable features present an insurmountable difficulty in adult second language acquisition. The experimental study supporting the IH examines Greek native speakers’ knowledge of gaps versus resumptive pronouns in English wh-movement. A crucial assumption is that Greek allows resumptives optionally. Alexopoulou and Keller’s (2002, 2007) findings confirm that assumption. In our replication of Tsimpli and Dimitrakopoulou’s study, we divide Spanish native speakers into those who accept resumptives and those who do not; then we look at their acceptance of gaps and resumptives in English. The results indicate that both groups of advanced learners, those that do and those that don’t have resumptives in their individual grammars, have acquired the ungrammaticality of resumptives in English, although there may be lingering native language effects. The effects of d-linking, animacy, syntactic function of the resumptive/gap (subject vs. object), and presence of the complementizer "that" are also examined.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 10 September 2012
Organisations: Modern Languages and Linguistics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353329
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353329
ISSN: 1367-0069
PURE UUID: 8797966f-a174-4834-a1d6-aa79b0bebb8b
ORCID for Roumyana Slabakova: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5839-460X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jun 2013 10:40
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Tania Leal Mendez

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×