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Using the notion of mental models in design to encourage optimal behaviour in home heating use

Using the notion of mental models in design to encourage optimal behaviour in home heating use
Using the notion of mental models in design to encourage optimal behaviour in home heating use
Introduction: Understanding how to influence householder’s energy consuming behaviour, could inform far reaching strategies to combat climate change. A Mental Model (MM) approach to design, to encourage optimal behaviour was explored. Challenges exist in accessing, describing and analysing user MMs and associated behaviour.

Method: A method that considered bias in interpretation was developed, involving a structured interview, concept maps and graphical self-reported behaviour. Using this method, 6 householders in matched accommodation, over winter 2011/2012, participated in a home heating case study. Thermostat set point data was also collected from participant’s households. A home heating expert was interviewed using the same method, for comparison.

Results and discussion: Key variations in MMs of home heating were found. The differences in user MMs from each other, and an expert, were insightful in explaining non-optimal home heating operation. These suggest design solutions that could promote or compensate for user mental models to influence energy consumption.
mental models, design, behaviour change, domestic energy consumption, home heating
979-10-92329-00-1
Revell, Kirsten M.A.
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten M.A.
e80fedfc-3022-45b5-bcea-5a19d5d28ea0
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Revell, Kirsten M.A. and Stanton, Neville A. (2013) Using the notion of mental models in design to encourage optimal behaviour in home heating use At 11th International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making 2013 (NDM 2013), France. 22 - 24 May 2013. 6 pp.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Introduction: Understanding how to influence householder’s energy consuming behaviour, could inform far reaching strategies to combat climate change. A Mental Model (MM) approach to design, to encourage optimal behaviour was explored. Challenges exist in accessing, describing and analysing user MMs and associated behaviour.

Method: A method that considered bias in interpretation was developed, involving a structured interview, concept maps and graphical self-reported behaviour. Using this method, 6 householders in matched accommodation, over winter 2011/2012, participated in a home heating case study. Thermostat set point data was also collected from participant’s households. A home heating expert was interviewed using the same method, for comparison.

Results and discussion: Key variations in MMs of home heating were found. The differences in user MMs from each other, and an expert, were insightful in explaining non-optimal home heating operation. These suggest design solutions that could promote or compensate for user mental models to influence energy consumption.

Text Revell & Stanton, Doctoral Review, NDM 2013.pdf - Author's Original
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: May 2013
Venue - Dates: 11th International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making 2013 (NDM 2013), France, 2013-05-22 - 2013-05-24
Keywords: mental models, design, behaviour change, domestic energy consumption, home heating
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353349
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353349
ISBN: 979-10-92329-00-1
PURE UUID: bbc6ad39-6b15-4788-9976-3448bd3577b5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jun 2013 13:59
Last modified: 03 Oct 2017 16:40

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