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Thermal Remote Sensing of Active Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning Events

Thermal Remote Sensing of Active Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning Events
Thermal Remote Sensing of Active Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning Events
Thermal remote sensing is widely used in the detection, study, and management of biomass burning occurring in open vegetation fires. Such fires may be planned for land management purposes, may occur as a result of a malicious or accidental ignition by humans, or may result from lightning or other natural phenomena. Under suitable conditions, fires may spread rapidly and extensively, affecting the land cover properties of large areas, and releasing a wide variety of gases and particulates directly into Earth’s troposphere. On average, around 3.4 % of the Earth’s terrestrially vegetated area burns annually in this way. Vegetation fires inevitably involve high temperatures, so thermal remote sensing is well suited to its identification and study. Here we review the theoretical basis of the key approaches used to (1) detect actively burning fires; (2) characterize sub-pixel fires; and (3) estimate fuel consumption and smoke emissions. We describe the types of airborne and spaceborne systems that deliver data for use with these active fire thermal remote sensing methods, and provide some examples of how operational fire management and fire research have both benefited from the resulting information. We commence with a brief review of the significance and magnitude of biomass burning, both within the ‘whole Earth’ system and in more regional situations, aiming to highlight why thermal remote sensing has become so important to the study and management of open vegetation burning.
978-94-007-6638-9
17
347-390
Springer
Wooster, Martin
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Roberts, Gareth
fa1fc728-44bf-4dc2-8a66-166034093ef2
Smith, Alistair
499837f0-eb32-44d6-b4a2-ac78937ac845
Johnston, Joshua
b4e72acc-511a-4bb3-8db3-ff28c836add9
Freeborn, Patrick
8bd735b1-4417-4102-b3d2-29eda08bc00e
Amici, Stefania
9f7539ba-6fe6-4b85-b5dd-c0472fbc11e0
Hudak, Andrew
aa8846e8-efdb-455a-bba2-e3d02e905545
Kuenzer, Claudia
Dech, Stefan
Wooster, Martin
5cba1077-58b9-4c4a-84af-3895c75b1e3d
Roberts, Gareth
fa1fc728-44bf-4dc2-8a66-166034093ef2
Smith, Alistair
499837f0-eb32-44d6-b4a2-ac78937ac845
Johnston, Joshua
b4e72acc-511a-4bb3-8db3-ff28c836add9
Freeborn, Patrick
8bd735b1-4417-4102-b3d2-29eda08bc00e
Amici, Stefania
9f7539ba-6fe6-4b85-b5dd-c0472fbc11e0
Hudak, Andrew
aa8846e8-efdb-455a-bba2-e3d02e905545
Kuenzer, Claudia
Dech, Stefan

Wooster, Martin, Roberts, Gareth, Smith, Alistair, Johnston, Joshua, Freeborn, Patrick, Amici, Stefania and Hudak, Andrew (2013) Thermal Remote Sensing of Active Vegetation Fires and Biomass Burning Events. In, Kuenzer, Claudia and Dech, Stefan (eds.) Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing. (Remote Sensing and Digital Image Processing, , (doi:10.1007/978-94-007-6639-6_18), 17, 17) Springer, pp. 347-390. (doi:10.1007/978-94-007-6639-6_18).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Thermal remote sensing is widely used in the detection, study, and management of biomass burning occurring in open vegetation fires. Such fires may be planned for land management purposes, may occur as a result of a malicious or accidental ignition by humans, or may result from lightning or other natural phenomena. Under suitable conditions, fires may spread rapidly and extensively, affecting the land cover properties of large areas, and releasing a wide variety of gases and particulates directly into Earth’s troposphere. On average, around 3.4 % of the Earth’s terrestrially vegetated area burns annually in this way. Vegetation fires inevitably involve high temperatures, so thermal remote sensing is well suited to its identification and study. Here we review the theoretical basis of the key approaches used to (1) detect actively burning fires; (2) characterize sub-pixel fires; and (3) estimate fuel consumption and smoke emissions. We describe the types of airborne and spaceborne systems that deliver data for use with these active fire thermal remote sensing methods, and provide some examples of how operational fire management and fire research have both benefited from the resulting information. We commence with a brief review of the significance and magnitude of biomass burning, both within the ‘whole Earth’ system and in more regional situations, aiming to highlight why thermal remote sensing has become so important to the study and management of open vegetation burning.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 15 May 2013
Published date: July 2013
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353493
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353493
ISBN: 978-94-007-6638-9
PURE UUID: 22ba6a79-5aae-4f5c-ac75-cabb226458c7

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jun 2013 15:57
Last modified: 04 Oct 2018 16:31

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